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  • Article

    Selling Avon

    Fast and funny, The Compleat Works of Wllm Shkspr (Abridged) skewers the Bard and honors him, too. In fact, the more you love Shake-speare, the more amused you're likely to be by this jolly nonsense, now in its regional premiere. The comedy, which re...

    on February 6, 1997
  • Article

    Do the Wrong Thing

    True story: A young seminary instructor was discussing the nature of evil in his class when a woman raised her hand and told him she did not believe in evil. "Really?" he said. "What do you call Auschwitz?" The student replied, "Well, it's evil for m...

    on February 6, 1997
  • Article

    Naked Ambitions

    The Denver Art Museum has undertaken one extensive remodeling job after another in the last few years. And the efforts have gone a long way toward increasing available space within the masterful if quirky building, the work of Italian modern master G...

    by Michael Paglia on January 30, 1997
  • Article

    No Strings Attached

    The only way to describe playwright August Wilson's Seven Guitars is with superlatives: Wilson's writing is inspired, and Israel Hicks's casting and direction is nothing short of brilliant. The night I saw the show, it received a standing ovation fro...

    on January 30, 1997
  • Article

    Sea Minus

    It may seem intriguing at first, but self-indulgent craziness gets old fast. That's the problem with Don Nigro's Seascape With Sharks and Dancer--it starts out well, but because the main creature is so sunk in self-pity, she doesn't evolve. Such a fa...

    on January 30, 1997
  • Article

    A Stylish Woman

    Denver exhibition-goers will have to go to great lengths--or should that be heights?--to see the city's latest ad-hoc art gallery. It's located in a couple of hallways on the twelfth floor of a downtown high-rise, just off the lobby of the OZ Archite...

    by Michael Paglia on January 23, 1997
  • Article

    Lady in Waiting

    Eleanor of Aquitaine was arguably the greatest woman of the late medieval period. She was beautiful and brilliant, a patron of the arts and a cultivator of the chivalric code. She defied the church hierarchy, married a French king and dumped him for ...

    on January 23, 1997
  • Article

    Applause and Effects

    When that broken-down, opera-sized chandelier lying on the stage flies out over the audience and up to the ceiling in The Phantom of the Opera, it's enough to justify the price of admission. The special effects in the Broadway road show of Andrew Llo...

    on January 23, 1997
  • Article

    Cheyenne Autumn

    It was a research project with the drama of a detective story. And just as Sherlock Holmes unraveled mysteries--using a method reliant on fanatical attention to detail--so too did the organizers of Cheyenne Dog Soldiers, which currently fills the mai...

    by Michael Paglia on January 16, 1997
  • Article

    Armageddoned and Dangerous

    Don Becker is a manic-depressive guy "with psychotic features" who writes humorous stuff for a living--first as a stand-up comic, now as one of Denver's most irreverent playwrights. His first play, Back on a Limb, was a one-man show, an expose of his...

    on January 16, 1997
  • Article

    End Piece

    It's always Armageddon for somebody. Don Becker's dark new comedy, Kurt Cobain Was Right, puts a new spin on modern end-of-the-world themes harking all the way back to the Theater of the Absurd and cinematic spinoffs like Dr. Strangelove. The Lida Pr...

    on January 16, 1997
  • Article

    Mything Persons

    So much of the best musical comedy to favor the region recently has come from Boulder Dinner Theatre that it's no surprise that BDT's production of Lerner and Loewe's Camelot is just what it should be--magical. This isn't Lerner and Loewe's best work...

    on January 9, 1997
  • Article

    Bedding Down

    The central symbol of a long-lasting marriage in Jan de Hartog's bittersweet The Four Poster is the marriage bed itself. Sexual tension is important in this poignant comedy from the Nomad Players, but the real point is a couple's attempts to reach ea...

    on January 9, 1997
  • Article

    Arkansas Raveler

    Artists have taken many routes to fame. Salvador Dali struck a chord with unforgettable images such as melting clocks. And like Picasso and Andy Warhol, two other truly famous artists, Dali led a flamboyant life that served to enhance his reputation ...

    by Michael Paglia on January 2, 1997
  • Article

    Season's Bleatings

    Heritage Square's Music Hall's comic melodramas may not appeal to everyone, but their pleasant buffoonery is a hit with audiences willing to put up with a little foolishness. The goony style of these frolics can't really be confused with acting, but ...

    on December 26, 1996
  • Article

    Remembering Rigsby

    1993 was a terrible year for the local art world. First the galleries started closing--Joan Robey, Alpha, Hassel Haeseler and Payton-Rule. Then the artists started dying--Wes Kennedy, Edward Marecak and David Rigsby. In the years since, both Ken...

    by Michael Paglia on December 19, 1996
  • Article

    What the Dickens

    "Marley was dead to begin with." Charles Dickens opened A Christmas Carol, his greatest ghost story and arguably the best secular Christmas tale ever written, with these strange, portentous words. In 150 years, the incredible success of the novella a...

    on December 19, 1996
  • Article

    Renaissance Men

    The arts and the sciences came together in the Renaissance in a way they never had before. Aristotle's limited universe, in which the sun and planets revolved around the Earth, was discarded in favor of Copernicus's more accurate assessment. And it w...

    on December 19, 1996
  • Article

    Lumps of Clay

    Clay is a material that occupies a special--or should that be peculiar?--place in the world of the visual arts. It is most often employed in the making of utilitarian objects such as cups, mugs and vases and is therefore relegated to the underworld o...

    by Michael Paglia on December 12, 1996
  • Article

    The X-Mas Files

    'Tis the season for gooey sentiments, so you'd better watch out if you're headed for the New Denver Civic's gangly rendition of Louisa May Alcott's classic Little Women. But there's no need to pout: The real thing is out there in theaterland this hol...

    on December 12, 1996
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