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Best Of :: People & Places

Best Advice for New Rural Residents

Growth is a hot topic in Colorado these days. But when it comes to knowing and abiding by basic land-use laws, some of those who are most concerned about growth seem to be the most clueless. To help prevent lawsuits and shootouts, a pair of attorney/mediators from southwestern Colorado, Nancy Greif and Erin Johnson, held a "good neighbor" seminar in Durango a couple of years ago -- and the response was so overwhelming that they've since written a book. With chapters contributed by 37 different land-use experts and a recurring character called Colorado Red, The Good Neighbor Guidebook for Colorado covers such topics as caring for your property responsibly, geo-hazards, dealing with various levels of government and, when all else fails, using the Colorado courts. The guidebooks sells for $27.95 in bookstores and online at www.goodneighborguide.com. Won't you be our neighbor?

Best Development to Come Out of the News-Post Joint Operating Agreement

Quit the funny business! The newspaper war's over, and the terms of the settlement make readers the undisputed victors in one area: comics. Come April, the Denver Post will boast the largest Sunday comics section in the country, since it's adding the Rocky Mountain News's former lineup to its own on that day. (The News will return the favor by running the Post's comics on Saturday -- but those aren't the big, four-color Sunday funnies.) You might not give a hoot about Willy 'n' Ethel, much less that fusspot Nancy. But for many readers, comic strips are the most important part of their Sunday paper -- and they complain long and hard whenever the dailies fool around with them. Now, though, it won't be a matter of one paper stealing Garfield from the other -- they'll share weekend custody of the curmudgeonly cat. But since the Post won the right to print the town's only Sunday rag, that's where you'll find the lollapalooza of laughs -- everything from A (Annie, Little Orphan) to Z (Zippy the Pinhead). It's double the pleasure, double the funnies.

Best Insult of the Denver Post in the Rocky Mountain News

To the chagrin of her editors, reporter/columnist Lynn Bartels wrote in an October 1 piece that the prose in a "how-to tome for incoming lawmakers" by the Office of Legislative Legal Services was "so technical and boring it reads like the Denver Post."

Best Insult of the Rocky Mountain News in the Denver Post

In a September 18 column, Chuck Green, who's done more crowing about the Post's JOA victory than anyone this side of Dean Singleton, wrote that he'd never considered switching to the Rocky Mountain News during his time in newspapering for a simple reason: "Why work for a bunch of liars and thieves when you can fight on the side of goodness and virtue -- and come out the winner, too?"

Best Place to Learn How to Be a Millionaire

It's not easy being rich. There are expensive cars to buy, blobs of caviar to eat, old friends to ignore. So how does the aspiring millionaire learn how to live up to his Diamond Jim destiny? In school, of course -- specifically, the University of Denver, which last year made "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire" one of its seventy freshmen seminars. Professor Robert Mills offered students their choice of several millionaire lifestyles, then reported on how they would live them out. The one-credit class was one of seventy freshman seminars intended to keep students interested in school. Now, about that financial aid.

Best Place to Learn How to Be a Millionaire

It's not easy being rich. There are expensive cars to buy, blobs of caviar to eat, old friends to ignore. So how does the aspiring millionaire learn how to live up to his Diamond Jim destiny? In school, of course -- specifically, the University of Denver, which last year made "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire" one of its seventy freshmen seminars. Professor Robert Mills offered students their choice of several millionaire lifestyles, then reported on how they would live them out. The one-credit class was one of seventy freshman seminars intended to keep students interested in school. Now, about that financial aid.

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Best Advice for New Rural Residents: The Good Neighbor Guidebook for Colorado

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