Film Reviews

Latest Reviews

  • One reason why Isabelle Huppert makes suffering so compelling on screen is her sheer -- well, "unflappability" isn't quite the right word. It's a kind of ironic distance, perhaps: The actress can convey curiosity, bewilderment and coolness all at...

  • Here’s a recurring nightmare I’ve had since seeing Nicolas Pesce’s The Eyes of My Mother: I’m parking my car — I don’t even have a car — on a desolate street in broad daylight. As I put change in the meter, a man walks close beside me, then...

  • Nice girls play by the rules. They turn their shoulders inward and nibble on the ends of their slim fingers, nervous about all those difficult thoughts in their heads. And their hair is always perfect and feathery like a baby bird on a...

  • Eventually, there will be so many films about a sullen or damaged man returning to his provincial town to face the demons of his past that Netflix will make a separate category for them. At their worst, these movies are navel-gazing vanity...

  • Miss Sloane opens with a clever gambit: Jessica Chastain's face fills the screen in a tight close-up as she talks about strategy, breaking the fourth wall. From its opening minutes, the audience is put at the mercy of a charismatic figure...

  • There's a grand concept to Seasons, the animal-observation doc from the creators of Winged Migration and Oceans, but in practice the film, a beauty, is about animals surprising you. You'll be pleasantly engaged in observing a...

  • Ali and Nino, with its grand tale of love and war, feels like something of a throwback. The film, based on the 1937 novel by Kurban Said, takes place in a divided Azerbaijan on the brink of World War I and centers on the romance between...

  • Tom Ford has entirely overstuffed his nesting-doll domestic drama-cum-thriller Nocturnal Animals, and yet I spent much of the film worrying that it might not have a point. Its aesthetic footprint is huge, but its impact decidedly small scale....

  • When last we saw Howard Hughes onscreen, Leonardo DiCaprio was repeating "the way of the future" ad infinitum as he gazed into the mirror. Warren Beatty's long-in-the-making Rules Don't Apply isn't nearly as concerned with the future as...

  • As Allied opens, Brad Pitt parachutes so gently and quietly onto a stretch of Moroccan desert that at first you think he might be dead. And maybe he sort of is -- maybe he has to be. Pitt's Max Vatan is a pinched, terse figure in...

Newsletters

All-access pass to the top stories, events and offers around town.

  • Top Stories
    Send:

Newsletters

All-access pass to top stories, events and offers around town.

Sign Up >

No Thanks!

Remind Me Later >