Film Reviews

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  • Two Bond villains and Eva Green walk into a western, and they emerge with a rugged -- if far from revolutionary -- old-school horse-opera throwback. Having long since ditched the Dogme 95 precepts that guided his breakout 2000 feature The King...

  • Is it possible to like a movie yet feel revulsion toward its script? David Cronenberg’s Maps to the Stars is clearly intended as a sharp satire of Hollywood ambition, vanity, avarice and emptiness, and in places it’s smart and astringently funny....

  • If Grace Kelly had been raised by coyotes, she might have stalked the screen like Focus’s Margot Robbie, a va-va-voom blonde with bite. Robbie is too beautiful to play normal, too sly to play nice. Miscast as a shy saint in Craig Zobel’s upcoming...

  • The makers of The Lazarus Effect, an uninspired horror film about modern-day mad scientists, do nothing noteworthy with their heady what-if premise: What do you see right before you die, and what would happen if you came back from the...

  • Where we come from defines us more than we even realize: That’s the idea implicit in Andrey Zvyagintsev’s somber, sturdily elegant drama Leviathan, in which a mechanic who has lived on the same parcel of land all his life — as his father and...

  • A death in the family is always unsettling, which may explain why adolescent James Charm (Kodi Smit-McPhee), whose father has just died, runs from imaginary(?) hooded creatures and has taken to telling people the dates of their own eventual...

  • Tomm Moore's touching Song of the Sea is not anime, but it shares elements with some of the best anime films of recent years, particularly Mamoru Hosoda's Wolf Children. Then again, certain kinds of legends pop up in every culture....

  • Tidy, conventional horror stories are all about cause and effect. The scariness derives from not understanding what's happening, and the resolution lies in discovering the causes. With its ghosts, its spooky old house, and the story's roots in...

  • Shove off, John Hughes. The DUFF, a high school comedy by Ari Sandel, opens by declaring that The Breakfast Club's social categories are, like, way passé. Explains lead Bianca (Mae Whitman), "Jocks play video games,...

  • Five years ago, four losers passed out in a jacuzzi, boiled back to 1986, healed their past wounds, rocked out to Poison, and returned to their timeline as gods. Thusly, Hot Tub Time Machine director Steve Pink was hailed as a minor deity:...