Film Reviews

Latest Reviews

  • “This year we hunt big game. This year you get your first kill.” So says seasoned hunter Cal (Matt Bomer) to his teenage son David (Josh Wiggins), who’s arrived in rural Montana for his annual visit, and even those going in unfamiliar with the...

  • My favorite biopics — those that tell any portion of a real person’s story faithfully — are those that borrow from other genres. Pablo Larrain’s Jackie possesses the kinetic punch of a horror film. Mario Van Peebles’ Baadasssss! is a sharp...

  • The last few months have seen some welcome innovation in the cry-along subgenre of dramas about finding the will to keep living after bodily catastrophe. First, in the notably sincere and unsensational Stronger, director David Gordon Green and...

  • In the opening shot of Only the Brave, a flaming bear — not just a bear that happens to be burning but one that looks as if it had been created entirely from fire — lunges at the camera in the middle of a blazing forest. The image returns a...

  • Fifty years ago, in 1967, Cool Hand Luke, The Graduate, Bonnie and Clyde, In the Heat of the Night and The Dirty Dozen rocked American cinemas. And somewhere in a field outside Pittsburgh, George Romero and John Russo were shooting...

  • The numbers in the title of 78/52: Hitchcock's Shower Scene refer to the number of setups and shots that were required to create the shocking cinematic savagery that occurs less than an hour into the director's 1960 masterpiece,...

  • Adam Sandler's core as a performer has always been his self-loathing. In his best comedies, he weaponizes it with humiliating ruthlessness. Now, he's given the performance of his life in Noah Baumbach's free-spirited and likable The Meyerowitz...

  • You're right not to trust a film critic who calls a move stunning. But let me say this about Human Flow, the epic new documentary surveying the scope of the global refugee crisis, from the Chinese artist/activist Ai Weiwei: It...

  • Writer/director Angela Robinson's Professor Marston and the Wonder Women, is achingly normal, in a good way. Robinson has proven herself capable of melding her sincere and often endearingly campy sensibilities to any cinematic style -- spy...

  • Reginald Hudlin's Marshall plays like the tony pilot of a TV law procedural, a legal thriller/buddy comedy about a crusading lawyer traveling the country on behalf of the NAACP, defending black men charged with crimes they probably didn't...

  • Even if it hadn’t been essentially lost, James Whale’s The Old Dark House (1932) wouldn’t ever have fit, exactly, on the Mount Rushmore of Universal’s horror greats: Frankenstein, that ol’ corpse’s wife, the Wolfman, Dracula and — since actually...

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