Denver Roads May Be Terrible, But Things Could Be Worse

Additional images and more below.EXPAND
Additional images and more below.
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As our recent collection of the fifteen funniest/most painful pothole memes makes clear, Denver-area drivers have been lamenting what many see as the terrible condition of local roads.

But according to a new report from TRIP, a national transportation research group based in Washington, D.C., things could be worse.

A lot worse.

Among the data gathered in "Bumpy Roads Ahead America’s Roughest Rides and Strategies to Make our Roads Smoother," on view below, is a list of the 25 large urban regions (defined as the "major city in a region and its neighboring or surrounding suburban areas" with a population of 500,000 or more) that have the highest percentage of poor roads. And while Denver makes the list, it's not anywhere near the top.

No reason to celebrate this achievement, though. As you'll see, the percentage of poor roads in and around Denver is still frightfully high, albeit only a little more than half the total in the area determined to have the most problematic roads in the country.

See the photo-illustrated top 25 below, followed by the complete TRIP study, which also includes suggestions to improve the current situation.

Denver Roads May Be Terrible, But Things Could Be WorseEXPAND
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Number 1: San Francisco-Oakland, California
Percentage of poor roads: 74 percent

Number 2: Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana, California
Percentage of poor roads: 73 percent

Number 3: Concord, California
Percentage of poor roads: 62 percent

Denver Roads May Be Terrible, But Things Could Be WorseEXPAND
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Number 4: Detroit, Michigan
Percentage of poor roads: 56 percent

Number 5: San Jose, California
Percentage of poor roads: 53 percent



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