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Letters: "Only God can free gay immigrants from this bondage, not the USA"

Read last week's cover story here: "Coming out to America."

"Coming Out to America," Melanie Asmar, May 5

The Out Crowd

Why is Donn Livingston still hearing immigration cases? I was appalled to read that he had denied asylum to a gay man because he "does not dress in an effeminate manner or affect any effeminate mannerisms." Sounds to me like this judge has very bad judgment — and so does the government that keeps him on the court.

Sue Feld

Denver

American citizens need asylum from a tidal wave of immigrants.

Marsha Allen

Denver

These people are not illegal immigrants. They're coming to this country as students and as workers and want to stay here and live as we do, paying taxes just as we do. They would help our economy, not hurt it. And as bad as everyone thinks our government is, and as bad as we all think our problems are...they're worse pretty much everywhere else.

Rachel Nagle

Greenville, North Carolina

Only God can free them from this bondage. Not the USA.

B.J. Friedman

Salt Lake City, Utah

There's tons of room here for more people. Americans are greedy and spoiled. We sit on an entire nation of land stolen from the American natives by bigoted European settlers who couldn't see that their dung stunk, too!

Name withheld on request

Editor's note: For many more comments on "Coming Out in America," go to the online version at westword.com.

Restaurant Reviews by Laura Shunk

Name That Tuna

I enjoy Laura Shunk's writing on food and restaurants. She is very knowledgeable about different cultural/ethnic foods and traditions surrounding food, and she seems fair and respectful of the people/restaurants she writes about. I think it's good she examines the small restaurants out of the mainstream central Denver area, also.

A. Campbell

Denver

In her cleverly titled "Tapas the Town," in the April 28 issue, Ms. Shunk conveys her disappointment, stating: "Nor could I find the tuna in the aceitunas rellenos [sic], briny flash-fried olives that were supposed to be stuffed with the fish." Aceituna is spanish for olive. An aceituna rellena being a stuffed olive. There is no menu fraud committed in this case. It sounds like the 9th Door presents as advertised: a stuffed olive, albeit a flash-fried one. It might be a good idea to have someone with a working knowledge of español proofread Ms. Shunk's articles involving Spanish or Latin American cuisine in order to avoid such lost-in-translation moments in the future.

Buen provecho!

Sharpe Belote

Denver

Thank you for the articles in the May 5 issue reviewing two Korean restaurants in Aurora. They're good reviews, but I question Ms. Shunk's spelling when talking about the dishes. Bulgogi is typically not spelled boolgogi, and I think it is bibimbap, not bibimbob. One might investigate further. Bap translates to rice, I believe. Korean sushi is called kimbap, or gimbap. In the Korean language, there are some variables for translation, such as P=B (Pusan, Busan, for example), and G can be K.

I lived in Korea for a year and loved the cuisine. By the way, the pickled radish kimchi is called ggakduki — go figure. I wish we had more options for this wonderful fare closer to Denver.

Deb Weisman

Denver

Editor's note: According to the 9th Door's happy-hour menu, the aceitunas rellenos are "flash-fried tuna stuffed Spanish olives." The spellings of the dishes in the review of Silla were also taken from that restaurant's menu.


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