Reader: The Divide Between Colorado and States to the East Is Like the Berlin Wall

Nebraska highway checkpoint.
Nebraska highway checkpoint.

Even before the sale of recreational marijuana started in Colorado on January 1, law-enforcement officers in Nebraska and other states to the east were pulling over Colorado drivers for not much more than having those green-and-white plates. But earlier this month, Nebraska and Oklahoma took their anti-cannabis campaign a step further, when the attorneys general of both states filed suit in the U.S. Supreme Court, asking that Amendment 64 be overturned. See also: Kansas AG Still Looking at Joining Suit Against Amendment 64

Says Tom:

I find it appalling and unacceptable that I, as a Colorado resident with Colorado license plates, would actually now be afraid to drive my car into neighboring states such as Nebraska or Kansas, for fear of being profiled, and subjected to some sort of unlawful search and seizure, by small-time local or state law enforcement. The entire reason for this hinges on the asininity of criminalizing marijuana use. I don't even use marijuana myself, but I think the effort these states go to to make felons out of good people is ridiculous. If I drove to one of these states now, I can only imagine I would feel as if I had crossed from West Germany to East Germany prior to the fall of the Berlin Wall. It is 2014 and it's time for us to evolve as a nation. This petty pot enforcement is entirely out of control and unacceptable!

What do you think about Nebraska and Kansas going after Colorado drivers? What do you think about their lawsuit against Colorado over Amendment 64?

Send tips to patricia.calhoun@westword.com.


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