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THC driving limits: William Breathes is still waiting....

THC driving limits: William Breathes is still waiting....

After a week, I finally got the results from my blood test last Friday -- and unfortunately, the lab didn't give me the information I'd asked for. Fortunately, the state senate's judiciary committee just pushed back discussion of HB1261, also known as the marijuana DUI bill, by a week.

According to the Cannabis Therapy Institute, the hearing has been scheduled for 1:30 p.m. on Monday, April 18, at the State Capitol. That gives patients another week to contact their senators, the CTI reminds us.

The delay also gives me more time to get the answers I originally requested. Instead of getting a read on how much active THC I had in my system, the test gave my overall THC numbers. Since THC can stay in the body for more than thirty days, it wasn't surprising that my sober level was still sky-high at 859 nanograms per milliliter, and spiked at 1,335 nanograms per milliliter after some major puffing. Both results are interesting, but neither tells me anything about how much THC was -- or wasn't -- still affecting me. Or what HB's proposed limit of 5 nanograms per milliliter of active THC might mean for patients.

The tech at Any Lab Test Now said that she would contact the testing lab that actually ran my blood to see if she could get more detailed results. If not, I'm going to find another lab that will. Either way, I'm again playing a waiting game.

At least I have my freedom while I wait it out. According to Colorado State Patrol spokeswoman Heather Cobler, if this bill passes, people suspected of a marijuana DUI might have to sit in jail for as long as 21 days waiting on test results if they are unable to bond out. Here's how those tests would work, she says: Anyone suspected of driving under the influence of marijuana would have his blood drawn by a licensed phlebotomist -- either an EMT on staff at a local firehouse, or at a local medical center, depending on the municipality. After that, under the law, a cop would have seven days to get the blood to a lab -- and then the lab would have another fifteen days to get the results back to the police and the suspect.

Given that, waiting a few more days for my real results doesn't seem so bad...

As soon as we get a final answer on William's results, we'll post an update.


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