Metro Cannabis was among the first marijuana businesses to sponsor a Colorado highway, as seen in this 2015 image.
Metro Cannabis was among the first marijuana businesses to sponsor a Colorado highway, as seen in this 2015 image.
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Reader: Colorado's Highways Have Officially Gone to Pot

Colorado's highly regulated marijuana industry must also abide by certain rules around advertising. Dispensaries can't advertise on television, radio, in print or on the Internet unless they can prove that no more than 30 percent of their audience is younger than 21.

So dispensaries have gotten creative, taking to the Sponsor a Highway program to get their names in front of drivers. As Michael Roberts revealed, the result are an increasing number of do-good ganja signs lining our highways.

Readers are mixed on whether it's a good idea. Megan argues:

It's the only way they can technically advertise. So it's smart marketing and giving back to the community. That's a win win. 

Adds Harold: 

Even mountain towns that did not approve legalized marijuana for sale are being cleaned by the green. Hilarious.

Sher advises:

Give more to teachers!

Michael adds:

Wish they would help with fixing some of the pot-holes.

And Peter jokes:

So the roads have officially gone to pot.

 Keep reading for more of our coverage of cannabis.

Reader: Colorado's Highways Have Officially Gone to Pot
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Reader: Colorado's Highways Have Officially Gone to Pot
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Publication advertising limitations for marijuana have frustrated businesses for years, and the standards are just as strict when it comes to outdoor advertising. The statute emphasizes that in general, "it shall be unlawful for any Retail Marijuana Establishment to engage in Advertising that is visible to members of the public from any street, sidewalk, park or other public place, including Advertising utilizing any of the following media: any billboard or other outdoor general Advertising device; any sign mounted on a vehicle, any hand-held or other portable sign; or any handbill, leaflet or flier directly handed to any person in a public place, left upon a motor vehicle, or posted upon any public or private property without the consent of the property owner."

Among the few exceptions to this rule is the Colorado Department of Transportation's Sponsor a Highway program, and marijuana-business participation has been booming. Two years ago at this time, only a handful of pot shops were taking advantage of this opportunity. Now, dozens are doing so, agreeing to pay for cleanup from 12 to 26 times a year.

What do you think about the marijuana industry advertising on highways? Being prevented from using other outlets? Let us know in a comment or send an email to editorial@westword.com.

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