The young men move about the muddied hillside engaging in a friendly afternoon game of that national pastime known as hurling. On their way home, they are accosted by a platoon of "Black and Tans," the occupying soldiers sent from England to stamp out the crackling embers of Irish independence. The place is County Cork, circa 1920, six years after the Defence of the Realm Act banned "public meetings" deemed threatening to British national security. The soldiers demand to know the young men's names, and when one stubborn boy refuses to say his in English instead of Gaelic, he pays for the... More >>>