Events

The 21 Best Events in Denver, October 17-23

Catch plenty of creeps (a compliment in this case!) at the Broadway Halloween Parade.
Catch plenty of creeps (a compliment in this case!) at the Broadway Halloween Parade. Aaron Thackeray

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Broadway will get into the spirit during the Broadway Halloween Parade.
Broadway Merchants Association
Saturday, October 21

It’s been a long, long time since Front Range Halloween revelers marched in the streets, as they used to do a bit too rowdily decades ago in Larimer Square and along the Pearl Street Mall in Boulder. Too much drink had something to do with the demise of those events, but now there’s a new kid in town: The Halloween Parade on Broadway, hosted by the Broadway Merchants Association and District 7 City Councilman Jolon Clark. This is the real thing, a family-friendly parade complete with sponsored floats, live marching bands and such novelties as the Denver Hearse Association, Denver Roller Derby, Colorado Ghostbusters and the Badda Boom Brass Band; the costumed public is invited to fall in at the end. The parade tips off at 6 p.m. on Saturday, October 21, at Broadway and Third Avenue, then heads south to Alameda Avenue; both marching and watching are free. Find complete information at broadwayhalloweenparade.com.

Time to break out your finest monkey suit: The Denver Zoo’s annual costume party, Boo at the Zoo, returns starting Saturday, October 21. This fall classic is full of the fright stuff: Imagine tarantulas slowly stretching their hairy legs as they walk across your skin, or the feel of snake scales as a constrictor tightens around your throat. For the kids, there’s Spooky the Ghost’s Magic Show or the Halloween Spooktacular Juggling show, neither of which should trigger any night terrors. The Zoo, at 2300 Steele Street, hosts the not-so-horrible Halloween celebration from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on October 21, 22, 28 and 29. Admission fees run $12 to $17; find out more at denverzoo.org/booatthezoo.

F.W. Murnau’s 1922 film Nosferatu is the original cult classic. The lone movie produced by Prana Films, it was the subject of a copyright infringement lawsuit filed by Bram Stoker’s estate; most copies of the film were destroyed by court order, and the production company promptly declared bankruptcy. A few prints survived, however, and the movie went on to become one of cinema’s most influential silent films — and like Count Orlok himself, screenings of the masterpiece rise from the grave every October. This one starts at 9 p.m. Saturday, October 21, at Historic Grant Avenue, 216 South Grant Street, where Denver musician Hank Troy will perform an improvised piano accompaniment to the film. Tickets are $8 in advance at eventbrite.com or $10 at the door.

Marie Bracquemond's On the Terrace at Sèvres will be at the Denver Art Museum.
Denver Art Museum
Sunday, October 22

An art museum can’t go wrong with an occasional crowd-pleasing exhibit devoted to impressionist painters of the late nineteenth century, but Her Paris: Women Artists in the Age of Impressionism gives the topic a twist, focusing on the oft-ignored feminine side of the still-popular school of art. The traveling exhibit from the American Federation of Arts opens at the Denver Art Museum, 100 West 14th Avenue Parkway, on Sunday, October 22, bringing more than eighty paintings by both famous and lesser-known Parisian and Paris-educated women artists of the era, from the ones you expect (Berthe Morisot and Mary Cassatt) to the ones you don’t (Anna Ancher and Paula Modersohn-Becker). The show runs through January 14; tickets are $5 to $24 (free to $12 for DAM members), and you can get yours at denverartmuseum.org.

As Halloween draws close, it’s time to get your holiday affairs in order — or at least settle on your costume, because pickings will be getting slim at thrift stores and costume shops. If you’re looking for something particularly sick and twisted, head straight to the Oddities Market Part 2, running from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday, October 22, at Spectra Art Space, 1836 South Broadway, where you’ll find spooky home decorations and hair-raising artworks by hand-picked vendors. Or just drop by for an adult version of bobbing for apples, a pumpkin-painting contest, live music and glass-blowing demos. Admission is free; learn more and RSVP at spectraartspace.com.

Few musical genres inspire the hardcore collections of heavy metal. From merch table treasures to far-from-basic black apparel, the Heavy Metal Flea Market will welcome a murderer’s row of local metal-scene vendors from noon until 5 p.m. Sunday, October 22. The market has found a fitting home at Black Sky Brewery, 490 Santa Fe Drive, a hard-rocking beer hall at the southern end of the Santa Fe Arts District. Enjoy one of the fine brews on tap and a slice of New Haven-style pizza while selecting the perfect gift for the metalhead in your life. And since admission to the market is free, you’ll have plenty of money left for shopping. Find out more on Black Sky’s Facebook events page.

Monday, October 23

Every year, the Interfaith Alliance of Colorado hands out Force for Good Awards to people who are exhibiting very good behavior in one of three categories. This year’s honorees — Bishop Karen Oliveto and the Mountain Sky Area of the United Methodist Church (congregation category); Denver Homeless Out Loud (community) and Representative Joseph Salazar (state legislature) — will be celebrated at a reception that starts at 5:30 p.m. on Monday, October 23, at RedLine, 2350 Arapahoe Street. A $25 ticket gets you one drink ticket, appetizers, entertainment and very good company; proceeds benefit the Interfaith Alliance. Buy tickets and learn more at interfaithallianceco.org.

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