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Reader: Millennials Think History Means Their Cell-Phone Data Usage!EXPAND
Kenzie Bruce

Reader: Millennials Think History Means Their Cell-Phone Data Usage!

Denver has embraced street art. There are city grants that celebrate mural-making, intended to enrich communities and prevent graffiti. Crush Walls, RiNo's annual street-art festival, documents much of that neighborhood's street art for a year, going so far as to map out each mural or installation by intersection. And lately, artists have been getting stuck on wheat-pasting, as posters and art pieces keep showing up on buildings around town.

Wheat-pasting is accessible and affordable, as Frank Kwiatkowski notes in our interview with the local artist. And it's generally safe for any surface it adorns, unlike paint.

Says Aurora:

I love street art, don't get me wrong, but it breaks my heart to see these contemporary murals on an old historical building. I feel like this shouldn't be allowed. the damn building and brick are almost 100 years old, and we're slapping peace sign stick figures over the beautiful brick work.

Responds Kevin:

Louis Dupuy's Hotel de Paris has had an advertising mural on its exterior since 1892. The artwork is not original to the structure, but added later to draw attention and promote interest and commerce. I see history repeating itself here.

Notes Tarasa: 

Jesus, people, it's temporary. It legit helps the building and the neighborhood. People just have to have something to bitch about.

Suggests Chris: 

Only "tags" that should be up are on new buildings, slot-homes, fuckoplexes and the governor's and mayor's mansion.

Concludes Brad: 

Millennials don't know what history means other than their cell phone data-plan usage.

Keep reading for more stories on wheat-pasting.

Reader: Millennials Think History Means Their Cell-Phone Data Usage!
Kyle Harris

"This Mickey Mouse-Zapatista Nude Is Wheat-Pasted on Colfax Avenue"

Reader: Millennials Think History Means Their Cell-Phone Data Usage!
Kyle Harris

"Fading Denver Graffiti Honors a Woman Who Shot 300 Nazis"

Reader: Millennials Think History Means Their Cell-Phone Data Usage!EXPAND
Kenzie Bruce

"Wheat-Pasting in Denver: Frank Kwiatkowski"

Wheat-pasting, largely popularized by such artists as Shepard Fairey, is accessible; the paste can be made at home, or wallpaper paste can be used. Wheat-pasting has roots in graffiti and often resides in the same gray area as that medium.

Artist Frank Kwiatkowski describes the process as "grittier" than other art forms, comparing it to dark-room photography. It can also be intensely personal, as he shows in his work that takes on rights for diabetics as well as other social subjects.

We'll be profiling more of Denver's wheat-pasting artists over the next few weeks. What do you think of wheat-pasting? Post a comment, or email editorial@westword.com.

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