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| Fashion |

Street-Style: Accessory Designer Liz Hastings on Her Drag-Queen-From-Hell Look

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When we spotted visual merchandiser Liz Hastings in LoDo, we had to learn more about her unique street style. "I also make jewelry and thrift and up-cycle clothing and sell it on Etsy," she says. "I make flower crowns and paint skulls as well." Nonstop Feeling by Turnstile is her album of the moment. 

Hastings rocks UNIF all the time. "I'm from Baltimore, so I grew up knowing about John Waters and his films and Hairspray and all that jazz. Baltimore is full of eccentric people and John Waters is one of them," she says. True Romance is another film that inspires her aesthetic, and black is her favorite color. "Half of my wardrobe is black," she notes. 

This tattoo is one of Hasting's personal accessories. It's of her grandmother's sewing machine, and is mint green — like Hastings' hair. 

Marie Cat-toinette is another one of her favorite tattoos. "Whatever mood I'm in is how I'll get dressed. Some days I'm very girly and other days it's all-black everything. It really all depends on how I wake up and what mood I'm in," she explains.

She sometimes describes her style as "drag queen from hell because it's so over the top. Nothing I wear is ever practical. Fashion should be fun and be funny. I am not ashamed or embarrassed to wear anything. Fashion should have a personality. Be you, be comfortable. Your clothes are an expression of you. Don't be afraid to step outside the box if you are feeling it that day," she advises.

The rings that Hastings wears show her character. London street-style and Tumblr inspire her fashion sense, and so does The Adams Family, Clueless and The Craft. "I thrift half my wardrobe and pair it with something new, like UNIF or something from Dollskill," she says. 

These are Choke boots by UNIF. Hastings wears her pair with fishnet stockings. 

This backpack is by UNIF and cleverly incorporates the number of the beast, 666, into a smiley face. This is her  favorite accessory. "If I don't have a hair accessory like a big hat or something, I feel naked," adds Hastings.  Let's see what kind of things she carries with her on her day's journey. 

The bag holds a multitude of items. "My phone with a Totoro case, and my iPod with my Deadpool case, a Hello Kitty notepad, Elizabeth James perfume, and Hello Kitty perfume, a copy of Batgirl Volume two comic book, a kitten-printed make-up bag and MAC lipstick called Faux," she says.

Hastings is proof that fashion can be fun. She follows her instincts and draws from pop-culture to create her own fashion perspective. Never be afraid to dress based on your mood, Denver. 

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