Literature

Who's slammin' whom? Denver slam poetry teams make the national semifinals in Charlotte

Update: What a difference a year makes. Both Slam Nuba and the Denver Mercury Poetry Slam team went down in their semifinal rounds on Friday night, Slam Nuba in a sudden death slam-off against Da Poetry Lounge of Hollywood. Saturday Night's winner? Slam New Orleans.

Hopeful and pumped full of their best words, the Slam Nuba and Denver Mercury Poetry Slam teams both headed to the 2012 National Poetry Slam in Charlotte last week. So far, so good: They both did well in their preliminary rounds on Wednesday and Thursday nights, ranking fourth (Slam Nuba) and ninth (Mercury) in the overall standings among the 72 teams participating.

Also see: - Meet your 2012 slam poetry teams: Slam Nuba, Mercury Cafe and Minor Disturbance - Denver's Slam Nuba wins the National Poetry Slam - The Minor Disturbance youth slam poetry team rules the nation at Brave New Voices 2012

And they'll sail, with those nice numbers under their belts, into the semifinals tonight, two of twenty teams left vying for the 2012 title. From the midst of that fray, four teams will emerge to compete in tomorrow's finals. Give them a hand!

Slam Nuba has the 2011 national title to defend, and the Merc team took that honor in 2006; though faces and voices have changed for both over the years, the teams have a local slam poetry community of great depth to thank for their successes. Solidarity and a good foundation go a long way.

We'll keep you posted on the results.


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Susan Froyd started writing for Westword as the "Thrills" editor in 1992 and never quite left the fold. These days she still freelances for the paper in addition to walking her dogs, enjoying cheap ethnic food and reading voraciously. Sometimes she writes poetry.
Contact: Susan Froyd