If there's one thing that Colorado lobbyists, legislators and lawyers alike can agree on, it's the mean green at CityGrille. Last year former Bay Wolf owner Richard Salturelli and his partner/chef, onetime Beacon Grill chef David Minty, took over the old home of J. Beatty's, turning it into not just a watering hole for the town's movers and shakers, but also a respectable restaurant. CityGrille does grill up one of the town's best burgers; it also combines jalapeños, tomatoes and pork in a way few Mexican places have been able to muster, let alone master. This glorious, gravylike green chile has perfect smothering qualities, plus a fair number of soft, tender -- not gristly, not fatty -- pork chunks that make it ideal for eating with a couple of torts, too. A firm but not overwhelming chile kick adds extra interest, and the lack of greasiness means it's easy to wipe any accidental drips off those important court papers. But don't scrape the bottom of your empty plate too loudly; you'll want to hear the conversation of those around you. They're talking green -- and we don't mean chile.
Ah, the nineteenth hole. It comes on like a refreshing oasis after four hours of frustration spent hitting, then chasing, a little white ball. From the final tee box, the nineteenth hole rises in the distance like an ice-cold beer in the desert -- or, in the case of the public City Park Golf Course, a Corona in the desert. El Curso Viejo, to be specific. If your appetite hasn't been battered down by a day's worth of futility, stop in at this cozy cantina and gobble down one or two tasty breakfast burritos smothered in green chile. If your intelligence is still in order, go for an entire bowl of the vegetarian green. "We use three different kinds on chiles," says part-owner Marie Martinez, a New Mexico native who is unwilling to say much more about the secret trio, "one of which makes it hot and spicy and gives it a kick." After a day of golfing, a kick is sometimes just what you need.
Ah, the nineteenth hole. It comes on like a refreshing oasis after four hours of frustration spent hitting, then chasing, a little white ball. From the final tee box, the nineteenth hole rises in the distance like an ice-cold beer in the desert -- or, in the case of the public City Park Golf Course, a Corona in the desert. El Curso Viejo, to be specific. If your appetite hasn't been battered down by a day's worth of futility, stop in at this cozy cantina and gobble down one or two tasty breakfast burritos smothered in green chile. If your intelligence is still in order, go for an entire bowl of the vegetarian green. "We use three different kinds on chiles," says part-owner Marie Martinez, a New Mexico native who is unwilling to say much more about the secret trio, "one of which makes it hot and spicy and gives it a kick." After a day of golfing, a kick is sometimes just what you need.
Satisfy that sweet tooth before you get too long in the tooth. Cafe Cero, which is open until 2 a.m. every night but Monday, is just the spot for curbing post-theater munchies or relaxing after a tough night of bar-hopping, full of fun, groovy spaces that invite kicking back and grabbing a snack. The dessert menu, which is served until 1 a.m., changes frequently but usually features a decadent cheesecake as well as several varieties of heavenly moist cakes (the hazelnut is one of the best) and a superb crème brûlée. Get another drink (if you dare) or sip on some coffee, listen to whatever live act is playing -- sometimes it's comedy, sometimes it's music -- and enjoy your last insulin rush of the night.

Satisfy that sweet tooth before you get too long in the tooth. Cafe Cero, which is open until 2 a.m. every night but Monday, is just the spot for curbing post-theater munchies or relaxing after a tough night of bar-hopping, full of fun, groovy spaces that invite kicking back and grabbing a snack. The dessert menu, which is served until 1 a.m., changes frequently but usually features a decadent cheesecake as well as several varieties of heavenly moist cakes (the hazelnut is one of the best) and a superb crème brûlée. Get another drink (if you dare) or sip on some coffee, listen to whatever live act is playing -- sometimes it's comedy, sometimes it's music -- and enjoy your last insulin rush of the night.

Armida's
It's only fitting that one of the town's friendliest Mexican eateries also serves its most mellow chile. Fauso and Armida Corral own Armida's, a cute, unassuming spot with an upstairs for pool players, a dining room for diners and a patio for those who just want to enjoy the view and a few beers. No matter what you're there for, the Corrals zip around like ambassadors from Mazatlan, intent on seeing that you're treated right. And what treats you're treated to: everything from a zippy salsa to top-quality grilled sirloin. But we go on red alert for the red chile, gently spiced, made without meat but not lacking in flavor. A little smoky, with a hint of onion, a touch of garlic and lots of sweet tomato, the purée is as smooth as paint and only slightly thicker. Like everything else at Armida's, the red always tastes freshly made, and it's especially good on the fat, cheese-oozy enchiladas.
It's only fitting that one of the town's friendliest Mexican eateries also serves its most mellow chile. Fauso and Armida Corral own Armida's, a cute, unassuming spot with an upstairs for pool players, a dining room for diners and a patio for those who just want to enjoy the view and a few beers. No matter what you're there for, the Corrals zip around like ambassadors from Mazatlan, intent on seeing that you're treated right. And what treats you're treated to: everything from a zippy salsa to top-quality grilled sirloin. But we go on red alert for the red chile, gently spiced, made without meat but not lacking in flavor. A little smoky, with a hint of onion, a touch of garlic and lots of sweet tomato, the purée is as smooth as paint and only slightly thicker. Like everything else at Armida's, the red always tastes freshly made, and it's especially good on the fat, cheese-oozy enchiladas.

Best all-purpose chile, ristra and piñon stand

Hatch New Mexico Chile

When harvest season hits and you start craving roasted pine nuts, Hatch extra-hot chile and abuse from the vendors along Federal Boulevard, head straight for the tent of Roger Sanchez. From August through October, this prince of pods has one thing in mind: "Move it out." And move it he does. With daily price specials, free bottles of Mexican soda pop and the guarantee "If you don't like it, bring it back," Sanchez moves truckload after truckload of chile from his stand labeled "Hatch New Mexico Chile." And to prove you're getting the real thing, he provides packing slips straight from the Land of Enchantment. If it's Pueblo chile that lights your fire, he's got that, too, along with beans, red-chile ristras and kitchen supplies from south of the border. But once his roasters start rumbling, you'd better hurry. Some days the only chitchat the surly Sanchez has time for is: "Next!"

Best all-purpose chile, ristra and piñon stand

Hatch New Mexico Chile

When harvest season hits and you start craving roasted pine nuts, Hatch extra-hot chile and abuse from the vendors along Federal Boulevard, head straight for the tent of Roger Sanchez. From August through October, this prince of pods has one thing in mind: "Move it out." And move it he does. With daily price specials, free bottles of Mexican soda pop and the guarantee "If you don't like it, bring it back," Sanchez moves truckload after truckload of chile from his stand labeled "Hatch New Mexico Chile." And to prove you're getting the real thing, he provides packing slips straight from the Land of Enchantment. If it's Pueblo chile that lights your fire, he's got that, too, along with beans, red-chile ristras and kitchen supplies from south of the border. But once his roasters start rumbling, you'd better hurry. Some days the only chitchat the surly Sanchez has time for is: "Next!"
Table Mountain Inn Grill and Cantina
Courtesy Table Mountain Inn Facebook
The tastes of the Southwest have become such a caricature of themselves that it's hard to know what's really Southwestern anymore. But a stop at the Table Mountain Inn, a quaintly decorated getaway that's eye-catching without being kitschy, will quickly help clarify things. The restaurant is a casual spot that feels upscale but remains comfortable, filled with well-chosen art and appealing upholstery that evokes the Southwest without satirizing it. The food follows suit. The menu is a carefully chosen array of gourmet dishes and Old West favorites with a twist -- in the spirit of true Southwestern cuisine -- and the cooking is done with flair. Try the deep-fried tortilla shells filled with lobster and minced vegetables, or the heady wild-mushroom "tamales," or a house-cured, tequila-spiked trout that sports a nice citrus tang. Then head straight for the chiles rellenos, pepper-Jack-packed Anaheims covered with a crispy shell and smothered in a sweet green chile. Just be sure to leave room for the killer chocolate taco. Or simply decide to stay the night and start eating all over again at brunch, when all of the classic Southwestern ingredients -- chiles, avocado, cheese, onions, spicy meats -- often land in one dish.

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