In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, people were so excited by the development of the electric light that they found applications for it that we can hardly imagine today, like attaching bare lightbulbs to oak beams. One forgotten device was bathing a building's facade in light after nightfall. When Silversmith Cohen began to rehab the old Chamber of Commerce building -- which was designed by Denver architects Marean and Norton in 1909 -- in order to turn it into the Chamber Apartments, they found, first in local history books, and then buried in the terra cotta on the building itself, a hidden indirect lighting system. But like the rest of the place, the wiring was decrepit. The system was refitted to state-of-the-art standards, and this spring, though the building itself isn't finished, the electricity was turned on again. Now this old-fashioned light show is one of downtown's brightest spots.
It's fashionable in architecture to put up new buildings in styles that date back a hundred years. But many of these new old-timey buildings are too conservative to be visually interesting. Not so for the 1899 Wynkoop Building, which was developed by the Nichols Partnership and Loftus Development and designed by Sheers + Leese Associates and the Neenan Company. The particulars of the handsome neo-traditional building were worked out by Chris Sheers to complement its next-door neighbor, the beloved Ice House. With design oversight by the Colorado Historical Foundation, the bulk of the building -- which according to zoning could have been a skyscraper -- was downsized in a deal that allowed the developers to punch windows in the formerly windowless walls of the Ice House. The tradeoff was necessary because, surprisingly, the Ice House and nearby Union Station aren't within the boundaries of the landmark district, like the rest of LoDo, and therefore not protected. In spite of this, the building fits in and is a lot better than what we might have expected.

It's fashionable in architecture to put up new buildings in styles that date back a hundred years. But many of these new old-timey buildings are too conservative to be visually interesting. Not so for the 1899 Wynkoop Building, which was developed by the Nichols Partnership and Loftus Development and designed by Sheers + Leese Associates and the Neenan Company. The particulars of the handsome neo-traditional building were worked out by Chris Sheers to complement its next-door neighbor, the beloved Ice House. With design oversight by the Colorado Historical Foundation, the bulk of the building -- which according to zoning could have been a skyscraper -- was downsized in a deal that allowed the developers to punch windows in the formerly windowless walls of the Ice House. The tradeoff was necessary because, surprisingly, the Ice House and nearby Union Station aren't within the boundaries of the landmark district, like the rest of LoDo, and therefore not protected. In spite of this, the building fits in and is a lot better than what we might have expected.

Best place to take an afternoon nap without being disturbed

The State Capitol committee meeting rooms

Most people prefer to nod off in their own homes or offices, but then again, not every home or office has central air conditioning. So why not head over to the three-month homes/offices of our elected lawmakers? Take a seat in one of the big, comfy chairs in a basement committee meeting room, where the temperature stays at a moderate seventy degrees, put your head back, and do what the legislators do: Dream about getting something accomplished. As an added benefit, the droning of whatever distinguished gentleman or gentlewoman has the floor will knock you out like a lullaby. Sleep tight!

Best place to take an afternoon nap without being disturbed

The State Capitol committee meeting rooms

Most people prefer to nod off in their own homes or offices, but then again, not every home or office has central air conditioning. So why not head over to the three-month homes/offices of our elected lawmakers? Take a seat in one of the big, comfy chairs in a basement committee meeting room, where the temperature stays at a moderate seventy degrees, put your head back, and do what the legislators do: Dream about getting something accomplished. As an added benefit, the droning of whatever distinguished gentleman or gentlewoman has the floor will knock you out like a lullaby. Sleep tight!

At CU's main library, you can absorb the works of Aristotle, Socrates, Petrarch, Shakespeare, Kant, Crumb, Trudeau and the Marquis de Sade by way of osmosis as you nap luxuriously in one of the many study cubicles or on the couches that have been conveniently interspersed throughout. There's nothing more impressive to a smart gal or guy than someone lying there, drooling on himself with an open copy of Plato's Republic draped across his chest. You can even nod off reading the New York Times or the Economist in the library's periodicals room. If you're lucky, your dreams will be filled with images of Alan Greenspan sitting George W. Bush Jr. on his knee and explaining the importance of the Federal Reserve.

At CU's main library, you can absorb the works of Aristotle, Socrates, Petrarch, Shakespeare, Kant, Crumb, Trudeau and the Marquis de Sade by way of osmosis as you nap luxuriously in one of the many study cubicles or on the couches that have been conveniently interspersed throughout. There's nothing more impressive to a smart gal or guy than someone lying there, drooling on himself with an open copy of Plato's Republic draped across his chest. You can even nod off reading the New York Times or the Economist in the library's periodicals room. If you're lucky, your dreams will be filled with images of Alan Greenspan sitting George W. Bush Jr. on his knee and explaining the importance of the Federal Reserve.

Kids will be kids, and that's the real beauty of this project: Fourth- and fifth-grade "history detectives" at Dora Moore School did all the legwork for the Women of the West Museum's Denver Neighborhood Women's History Trail project, the first link in what museum officials hope will one day become an interconnected trail through the West designed to acknowledge the oft-unrecognized historical and community-building contributions of strong and singular women. They did it with the kind of uncontainable enthusiasm and grace only a kid can muster, and the resulting brochure and tour proved both fun and fascinating.

Kids will be kids, and that's the real beauty of this project: Fourth- and fifth-grade "history detectives" at Dora Moore School did all the legwork for the Women of the West Museum's Denver Neighborhood Women's History Trail project, the first link in what museum officials hope will one day become an interconnected trail through the West designed to acknowledge the oft-unrecognized historical and community-building contributions of strong and singular women. They did it with the kind of uncontainable enthusiasm and grace only a kid can muster, and the resulting brochure and tour proved both fun and fascinating.

Escuela Guadalupe is a small private endeavor developed under the wing of Our Lady of Guadalupe Church, itself a cast-iron anchor in the midst of a community torn by poverty and struggle. The school debuted last year, catering only to students in kindergarten through grade two. But small isn't necessarily problematic; in fact, it's the escuela's saving grace: Offering straightforward bilingual education in intimate, uncrowded classrooms with help from parents, who are required to volunteer a certain number of hours to the school annually, its goal is to challenge students without compromising their ability to learn. Next fall, the plan is to begin adding grades as the original student body matures, giving kids who might have been chewed up and spit out in the public schools a chance to excel all the way up to the eighth grade. ¡Viva la escuela!

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