The sportscasters who dominate Denver these days tend to be a bit on the dull side; with rare exceptions, they deliver the scores and highlights with maximum efficiency and minimum flair. But not Vic Lombardi, who's flashy, funny, energetic and a little off-kilter. He shoots -- and he scores!

Readers' choice: Tom Green, Channel 7

The sportscasters who dominate Denver these days tend to be a bit on the dull side; with rare exceptions, they deliver the scores and highlights with maximum efficiency and minimum flair. But not Vic Lombardi, who's flashy, funny, energetic and a little off-kilter. He shoots -- and he scores!

Readers' choice: Tom Green, Channel 7

For years, Marty Coniglio's weather reports have been Denver's most accurate. Now he's finally getting a chance to prove it in prime time -- and he's making the most of it.

Readers' choice: Mike Nelson, Channel 9

For years, Marty Coniglio's weather reports have been Denver's most accurate. Now he's finally getting a chance to prove it in prime time -- and he's making the most of it.

Readers' choice: Mike Nelson, Channel 9

Best impending entry into the Denver TV news scene

Channel 31

It's too soon to tell if the newscast being assembled for our neighborhood Fox affiliate will be worth a damn. But by raiding high-profile talent such as Ron Zappolo, Tom Martino and Phil Keating, Channel 31 has already thrown a much-needed scare into the complacent folks at the network outlets. This just in: Fox is known for shaking things up.

Best impending entry into the Denver TV news scene

Channel 31

It's too soon to tell if the newscast being assembled for our neighborhood Fox affiliate will be worth a damn. But by raiding high-profile talent such as Ron Zappolo, Tom Martino and Phil Keating, Channel 31 has already thrown a much-needed scare into the complacent folks at the network outlets. This just in: Fox is known for shaking things up.

The Colorado Lottery didn't think it was taking a gamble when it hired noted local advertising firm Karsh & Hagan Communications to produce its TV ads, and at first the decision paid off. Karsh & Hagan created some excellent and very funny ads, including the "Stranger Things Have Happened" series. In one of those ads, the company used the story of a San Francisco police officer who walked his beat carrying a wooden puppet dressed as a cop. Although his department tried to make him stop, the officer, Bob Geary, went to the media and was allowed to continue carrying Brendan O'Smarty (the dummy) with him. The Colorado Lottery's luck ran out, however, when Geary sued, claiming the agency had used his likeness without his permission (the case was transferred from San Francisco to Denver in April). In the suit, Geary also claims that the Colorado Lottery used him in order to entice children to gamble. Better luck next time.

Readers' choice: Rocky's Auto

The Colorado Lottery didn't think it was taking a gamble when it hired noted local advertising firm Karsh & Hagan Communications to produce its TV ads, and at first the decision paid off. Karsh & Hagan created some excellent and very funny ads, including the "Stranger Things Have Happened" series. In one of those ads, the company used the story of a San Francisco police officer who walked his beat carrying a wooden puppet dressed as a cop. Although his department tried to make him stop, the officer, Bob Geary, went to the media and was allowed to continue carrying Brendan O'Smarty (the dummy) with him. The Colorado Lottery's luck ran out, however, when Geary sued, claiming the agency had used his likeness without his permission (the case was transferred from San Francisco to Denver in April). In the suit, Geary also claims that the Colorado Lottery used him in order to entice children to gamble. Better luck next time.

Readers' choice: Rocky's Auto

In late August, Channel 7's helicopter videotaped a car chase that ended with Denver police officers beating the suspects they'd pursued. Not only was the footage a sterling display of pricey, state-of-the-art technology, but it generated some real news by providing graphic evidence of a police department run amok. That's the kind of thing television is supposed to do.
In late August, Channel 7's helicopter videotaped a car chase that ended with Denver police officers beating the suspects they'd pursued. Not only was the footage a sterling display of pricey, state-of-the-art technology, but it generated some real news by providing graphic evidence of a police department run amok. That's the kind of thing television is supposed to do.

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