At CU's main library, you can absorb the works of Aristotle, Socrates, Petrarch, Shakespeare, Kant, Crumb, Trudeau and the Marquis de Sade by way of osmosis as you nap luxuriously in one of the many study cubicles or on the couches that have been conveniently interspersed throughout. There's nothing more impressive to a smart gal or guy than someone lying there, drooling on himself with an open copy of Plato's Republic draped across his chest. You can even nod off reading the New York Times or the Economist in the library's periodicals room. If you're lucky, your dreams will be filled with images of Alan Greenspan sitting George W. Bush Jr. on his knee and explaining the importance of the Federal Reserve.

At CU's main library, you can absorb the works of Aristotle, Socrates, Petrarch, Shakespeare, Kant, Crumb, Trudeau and the Marquis de Sade by way of osmosis as you nap luxuriously in one of the many study cubicles or on the couches that have been conveniently interspersed throughout. There's nothing more impressive to a smart gal or guy than someone lying there, drooling on himself with an open copy of Plato's Republic draped across his chest. You can even nod off reading the New York Times or the Economist in the library's periodicals room. If you're lucky, your dreams will be filled with images of Alan Greenspan sitting George W. Bush Jr. on his knee and explaining the importance of the Federal Reserve.

Kids will be kids, and that's the real beauty of this project: Fourth- and fifth-grade "history detectives" at Dora Moore School did all the legwork for the Women of the West Museum's Denver Neighborhood Women's History Trail project, the first link in what museum officials hope will one day become an interconnected trail through the West designed to acknowledge the oft-unrecognized historical and community-building contributions of strong and singular women. They did it with the kind of uncontainable enthusiasm and grace only a kid can muster, and the resulting brochure and tour proved both fun and fascinating.

Kids will be kids, and that's the real beauty of this project: Fourth- and fifth-grade "history detectives" at Dora Moore School did all the legwork for the Women of the West Museum's Denver Neighborhood Women's History Trail project, the first link in what museum officials hope will one day become an interconnected trail through the West designed to acknowledge the oft-unrecognized historical and community-building contributions of strong and singular women. They did it with the kind of uncontainable enthusiasm and grace only a kid can muster, and the resulting brochure and tour proved both fun and fascinating.

Escuela Guadalupe is a small private endeavor developed under the wing of Our Lady of Guadalupe Church, itself a cast-iron anchor in the midst of a community torn by poverty and struggle. The school debuted last year, catering only to students in kindergarten through grade two. But small isn't necessarily problematic; in fact, it's the escuela's saving grace: Offering straightforward bilingual education in intimate, uncrowded classrooms with help from parents, who are required to volunteer a certain number of hours to the school annually, its goal is to challenge students without compromising their ability to learn. Next fall, the plan is to begin adding grades as the original student body matures, giving kids who might have been chewed up and spit out in the public schools a chance to excel all the way up to the eighth grade. ¡Viva la escuela!
Escuela Guadalupe is a small private endeavor developed under the wing of Our Lady of Guadalupe Church, itself a cast-iron anchor in the midst of a community torn by poverty and struggle. The school debuted last year, catering only to students in kindergarten through grade two. But small isn't necessarily problematic; in fact, it's the escuela's saving grace: Offering straightforward bilingual education in intimate, uncrowded classrooms with help from parents, who are required to volunteer a certain number of hours to the school annually, its goal is to challenge students without compromising their ability to learn. Next fall, the plan is to begin adding grades as the original student body matures, giving kids who might have been chewed up and spit out in the public schools a chance to excel all the way up to the eighth grade. ¡Viva la escuela!
When he was alive, cable mogul Bill Daniels was known for his generosity toward employees and colleagues alike, helping dozens of locals launch their own businesses. When he passed away earlier this year, Daniels left the bulk of his $1.4 billion estate to create a foundation that will become Colorado's largest, giving out 5 percent of its assets every year. About 75 percent of the foundation's annual donations will be made in Colorado, but Daniels didn't forget our neighboring states: the other 25 percent is earmarked for Wyoming, Utah, and New Mexico. Education and health care are expected to be priorities for the new Daniels Fund, and Coloradans should have reason to be grateful to Daniels for years to come.
When he was alive, cable mogul Bill Daniels was known for his generosity toward employees and colleagues alike, helping dozens of locals launch their own businesses. When he passed away earlier this year, Daniels left the bulk of his $1.4 billion estate to create a foundation that will become Colorado's largest, giving out 5 percent of its assets every year. About 75 percent of the foundation's annual donations will be made in Colorado, but Daniels didn't forget our neighboring states: the other 25 percent is earmarked for Wyoming, Utah, and New Mexico. Education and health care are expected to be priorities for the new Daniels Fund, and Coloradans should have reason to be grateful to Daniels for years to come.

Best way for Denver to celebrate the real start of the millennium

Party! Party!

And we're talking a big party, too -- a genuine blowout downtown, where Denver residents can dance in the streets instead of being tossed off of them by jackbooted cops, as they were during last year's party-pooping December 31 crackdown. Hey, it wasn't the real start to the millennium, anyway, city officials belatedly pointed out. So true. And now we're expecting big things from Denver on December 31, 2000, starting with a downtown open house complete with entertainment and ending with fireworks at Coors Field. Any chance of that? Stay tuned, says mayoral spokesman Andrew Hudson: Wellington Webb will discuss this very topic during his annual State of the City speech in early July.

Readers' choice: Multi-block party

Best way for Denver to celebrate the real start of the millennium

Party! Party!

And we're talking a big party, too -- a genuine blowout downtown, where Denver residents can dance in the streets instead of being tossed off of them by jackbooted cops, as they were during last year's party-pooping December 31 crackdown. Hey, it wasn't the real start to the millennium, anyway, city officials belatedly pointed out. So true. And now we're expecting big things from Denver on December 31, 2000, starting with a downtown open house complete with entertainment and ending with fireworks at Coors Field. Any chance of that? Stay tuned, says mayoral spokesman Andrew Hudson: Wellington Webb will discuss this very topic during his annual State of the City speech in early July.

Readers' choice: Multi-block party

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