His hey-dude antics have been an evening staple on KBPI for years -- so when the station's morning show, The Lockerroom, appeared on the verge of cratering (again!), no one was surprised that Willie B. was asked to save the day. What was unexpected, though, was his decision to work days and nights simultaneously; he spends Monday through Friday mornings from 5:30 to 10 a.m. in the company of cohorts Marc Stout and D-Mak (Darren McKee), then returns from 7 to 10 p.m. for a solo stint. Hook that man up to a caffeine IV.
Good a.m. television is a matter of balance: It should be bright and sunny enough to motivate viewers out the door, but not so gabby and giddy that folks will be looking for kittens to run over the second they slip behind the wheel. Channel 9 doesn't always turn this trick; that damn you-made-it-through-the-week song they play every Friday under a montage of wacky anchor antics is a threat to the entire Front Range pussycat population. But main man Gary Shapiro, weather trivialist Ed Greene, business boy Gregg Moss and follicle innovator Kyle Dyer are good company who, on most mornings, mix lighthearted insignificance and actual news in just the right proportions.

Readers' choice: Channel 9

Good a.m. television is a matter of balance: It should be bright and sunny enough to motivate viewers out the door, but not so gabby and giddy that folks will be looking for kittens to run over the second they slip behind the wheel. Channel 9 doesn't always turn this trick; that damn you-made-it-through-the-week song they play every Friday under a montage of wacky anchor antics is a threat to the entire Front Range pussycat population. But main man Gary Shapiro, weather trivialist Ed Greene, business boy Gregg Moss and follicle innovator Kyle Dyer are good company who, on most mornings, mix lighthearted insignificance and actual news in just the right proportions.

Readers' choice: Channel 9

As anyone in Denver who watches the news on anything like a regular basis knows all too well, no area news program is consistently excellent. But there's little doubt that Channel 7's 10 p.m. offering is the most improved. The anchor duo of Mitch Jelniker and Anne Trujillo is solid and credible; sports guy Tom Green is a fine writer who's witty to boot; and Marty Coniglio offers up weather predictions that have a better than even chance of being right. The station seems to have rejected the glitzy, superficial Natalie Pujo/"Real Life, Real News" era once and for all -- and thank goodness.

Readers' choice: Channel 9

As anyone in Denver who watches the news on anything like a regular basis knows all too well, no area news program is consistently excellent. But there's little doubt that Channel 7's 10 p.m. offering is the most improved. The anchor duo of Mitch Jelniker and Anne Trujillo is solid and credible; sports guy Tom Green is a fine writer who's witty to boot; and Marty Coniglio offers up weather predictions that have a better than even chance of being right. The station seems to have rejected the glitzy, superficial Natalie Pujo/"Real Life, Real News" era once and for all -- and thank goodness.

Readers' choice: Channel 9

Unlike most television execs, Velasquez doesn't hide behind a desk. Instead, she regularly steps in front of the camera to deliver editorials that have become tougher and more credible as time has worn on. Just as important, she's inspired the improvement of the station's once-unwatchable newscast. This return to respectability hasn't paid off in a larger audience: Channel 7's ratings remain anemic. But Velasquez deserves credit for focusing on substance over style.

Unlike most television execs, Velasquez doesn't hide behind a desk. Instead, she regularly steps in front of the camera to deliver editorials that have become tougher and more credible as time has worn on. Just as important, she's inspired the improvement of the station's once-unwatchable newscast. This return to respectability hasn't paid off in a larger audience: Channel 7's ratings remain anemic. But Velasquez deserves credit for focusing on substance over style.

The longtime ratings leader is undergoing a serious brain drain: Ron Zappolo and Phil Keating have already split for Channel 31, and veteran Ed Sardella is retiring from day-to-day duties. So if the station stays aloft, it will be because of Adele Arakawa, who's solid, forthright, and lends a welcome edge to a broadcast that desperately needs one. Bet against her at your peril.

Readers' choice: Ed Sardella, Channel 9

The longtime ratings leader is undergoing a serious brain drain: Ron Zappolo and Phil Keating have already split for Channel 31, and veteran Ed Sardella is retiring from day-to-day duties. So if the station stays aloft, it will be because of Adele Arakawa, who's solid, forthright, and lends a welcome edge to a broadcast that desperately needs one. Bet against her at your peril.

Readers' choice: Ed Sardella, Channel 9

The sportscasters who dominate Denver these days tend to be a bit on the dull side; with rare exceptions, they deliver the scores and highlights with maximum efficiency and minimum flair. But not Vic Lombardi, who's flashy, funny, energetic and a little off-kilter. He shoots -- and he scores!

Readers' choice: Tom Green, Channel 7

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