It can be easy to forget that outstanding college athletes are also capable of being outstanding college students. Many top university football and basketball players, in particular, never bother to graduate; others attend classes just so they can showcase their talents on the field as a warmup for a lucrative professional career. But it is possible to both study and sweat. This past year, seniors Tyler Church (DU-basketball), Corte McGuffey (UNC-football), Cale Bonds (Air Force-football), Ryan Hollingshead (Adams State-football), Adam Batliner (CU-track and field), Kristina Andersson (DU-skiing), Shelly Borrman (CSU-track and field), Heather O'Brien (Colorado College-track and field) and Heather Burroughs (CU-track and field) were athletic standouts. (McGuffey, a quarterback, earned a tryout with the world-champion St. Louis Rams.) Yet each also was diligent enough in the classroom to earn a prestigious NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship for great grades. And there's not a "recreation studies" major among them: Church studied biology, McGuffey and Bonds majored in biochemistry, and Andersson mastered mathematics.

After Colorado State's 41-14 upset win over arch-rival Colorado in the football-season opener at Mile High Stadium, CU players were pelted in the end zone with bottles and taunts from the CSU faithful. This, in turn, prompted a worked-up army of helmeted and shielded Denver police to Mace and teargas every animal, vegetable and mineral in sight -- including old people and children. "We didn't want them on the field," one police lieutenant explained. But by whose order? "The cops were out of control," one older fan said. "They showed no regard for anyone." Look for the CU/CSU series to resume on campus.

After Colorado State's 41-14 upset win over arch-rival Colorado in the football-season opener at Mile High Stadium, CU players were pelted in the end zone with bottles and taunts from the CSU faithful. This, in turn, prompted a worked-up army of helmeted and shielded Denver police to Mace and teargas every animal, vegetable and mineral in sight -- including old people and children. "We didn't want them on the field," one police lieutenant explained. But by whose order? "The cops were out of control," one older fan said. "They showed no regard for anyone." Look for the CU/CSU series to resume on campus.

As Cherry Creek High School's number-one singles player, eighteen-year-old Alicia Salas this spring won her fourth Colorado state tennis championship in as many years, equaling a record set by Cheyenne Mountain's Becky Varnum. The four-time winner, praised by her coach as a respectful opponent and an admirable role model for younger players, will head for Notre Dame University this fall and set her sights on the NCAA women's tennis title.

As Cherry Creek High School's number-one singles player, eighteen-year-old Alicia Salas this spring won her fourth Colorado state tennis championship in as many years, equaling a record set by Cheyenne Mountain's Becky Varnum. The four-time winner, praised by her coach as a respectful opponent and an admirable role model for younger players, will head for Notre Dame University this fall and set her sights on the NCAA women's tennis title.

Following the gruesome massacre in the school library on April 20, 1999, Columbine High School students had little to feel good about until December 4, when the Columbine Rebels beat favored Cherry Creek 21-14 to take the state 5A football championship. Fittingly, the winning players gave the trophy to Adam Kechter, the thirteen-year-old brother of their late teammate Matt Kechter, one of the students who was slain.

Readers' choice: CU Buffaloes

Following the gruesome massacre in the school library on April 20, 1999, Columbine High School students had little to feel good about until December 4, when the Columbine Rebels beat favored Cherry Creek 21-14 to take the state 5A football championship. Fittingly, the winning players gave the trophy to Adam Kechter, the thirteen-year-old brother of their late teammate Matt Kechter, one of the students who was slain.

Readers' choice: CU Buffaloes

The Blake Street Bombers have long since flown their last mission. In the new millennium, the Colorado Rockies' general manager, "Dealin' Dan" O'Dowd, and field manager, Buddy Bell, have replaced the old power urges with speed, finesse and pitchers who throw strikes -- and so far the results have been striking. The nouveaux Rox -- seventeen new names graced the Opening Day roster -- led by outfielders Tom Goodwin and Larry Walker, third baseman Jeff Cirillo and first-sacker Todd Helton (who's having a career year) have the best home-field record in the major leagues, remain true contenders for the National League West title and continue to thrill the throngs at Coors Field with an exciting new brand of ball.

Readers' choice: Colorado Avalanche

The Blake Street Bombers have long since flown their last mission. In the new millennium, the Colorado Rockies' general manager, "Dealin' Dan" O'Dowd, and field manager, Buddy Bell, have replaced the old power urges with speed, finesse and pitchers who throw strikes -- and so far the results have been striking. The nouveaux Rox -- seventeen new names graced the Opening Day roster -- led by outfielders Tom Goodwin and Larry Walker, third baseman Jeff Cirillo and first-sacker Todd Helton (who's having a career year) have the best home-field record in the major leagues, remain true contenders for the National League West title and continue to thrill the throngs at Coors Field with an exciting new brand of ball.

Readers' choice: Colorado Avalanche

After losing the NCAA Division II basketball final to Kentucky Wesleyan in 1999, Dunlap's 33-4 Roadrunners dominated the rematch March 25 in Louisville, Kentucky, 97-79, to win their first national title. Stocked with Coloradans and five players recruited in Australia, the Runners gave local hoops fans the touch of March Madness that the state's major college teams regularly fail to provide. In the wake of the big win, Dunlap turned down a coaching offer from California's Loyola Marymount University and signed a new five-year contract at Metro. Good for him, and for the school's 17,100 hard-working students.

Readers' choice: Sonny Lubick

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