What tribulations hath the post-Elway era wrought? Unceremoniously demoted in the 1999 pre-season by coach Mike Shanahan, former Bronco starting quarterback Bubby Brister fussed and fumed, then considered his options, then decided to stay on as young Brian Griese's backup out of loyalty to his teammates. But the fiery Louisianan's animus for Shanahan was evident: Said Bubby: "When I had a level head and thought about it, I said I can't walk out on [Bill Romanowski], [Ed] McCaffrey and Brian. But I know if it was a one-on-one card game and Mike dealt me that hand, I would probably do like they did back in the day." Fortunately for all concerned, Brister kept his Colt in the holster.

What tribulations hath the post-Elway era wrought? Unceremoniously demoted in the 1999 pre-season by coach Mike Shanahan, former Bronco starting quarterback Bubby Brister fussed and fumed, then considered his options, then decided to stay on as young Brian Griese's backup out of loyalty to his teammates. But the fiery Louisianan's animus for Shanahan was evident: Said Bubby: "When I had a level head and thought about it, I said I can't walk out on [Bill Romanowski], [Ed] McCaffrey and Brian. But I know if it was a one-on-one card game and Mike dealt me that hand, I would probably do like they did back in the day." Fortunately for all concerned, Brister kept his Colt in the holster.

Some "rides" on the Front Range are so grueling that they are little more than paths for you to walk your bike on. We're talking rides that, with enough skill, sweat and stupidity, are still possible to navigate. Dakota Ridge begins on the east side of Route 26 outside of Morrison, and traces the hogback separating Rt. 470 from Red Rocks. Climb the path on the north side of the ridge, a challenging but technically simple ride. About halfway along the ridge, though, you'll hit plenty of rocks and enough technical terrain to threaten your equilibrium and dome. Wear a helmet and prepare to rip your shoes out of their clips.

Readers' choice: Apex

Some "rides" on the Front Range are so grueling that they are little more than paths for you to walk your bike on. We're talking rides that, with enough skill, sweat and stupidity, are still possible to navigate. Dakota Ridge begins on the east side of Route 26 outside of Morrison, and traces the hogback separating Rt. 470 from Red Rocks. Climb the path on the north side of the ridge, a challenging but technically simple ride. About halfway along the ridge, though, you'll hit plenty of rocks and enough technical terrain to threaten your equilibrium and dome. Wear a helmet and prepare to rip your shoes out of their clips.

Readers' choice: Apex

Serious road bikers ride a fine line between simple masochism and insanity. Colorado hosts several full-day rides for the certifiable (the Triple Bypass, or Denver to Aspen), but if you are simply looking for a three-hour (or so) ride that will cause you acute pain, this one can't be beat. Begin at Chatfield State Park on South Wadsworth Boulevard. Head west into the foothills on Deer Creek Canyon Road. Turn left at Phillipsburg (which consists of an abandoned gas station). The road starts out easy enough, but soon turns into a series of killer switchbacks, climbing up what will seem to you like a sheer cliff. When you reach the top of this, you're not even close to done. Stay straight as the road turns into Pleasant Park Road. This climbs steadily (and, apparently, forever) into Conifer. From there it's finally all downhill: Barrel down Route 73, fly down North Turkey Creek Road to South Turkey Creek Road, and complete the vicious circle with a left turn back onto Deer Creek Canyon Road.

Serious road bikers ride a fine line between simple masochism and insanity. Colorado hosts several full-day rides for the certifiable (the Triple Bypass, or Denver to Aspen), but if you are simply looking for a three-hour (or so) ride that will cause you acute pain, this one can't be beat. Begin at Chatfield State Park on South Wadsworth Boulevard. Head west into the foothills on Deer Creek Canyon Road. Turn left at Phillipsburg (which consists of an abandoned gas station). The road starts out easy enough, but soon turns into a series of killer switchbacks, climbing up what will seem to you like a sheer cliff. When you reach the top of this, you're not even close to done. Stay straight as the road turns into Pleasant Park Road. This climbs steadily (and, apparently, forever) into Conifer. From there it's finally all downhill: Barrel down Route 73, fly down North Turkey Creek Road to South Turkey Creek Road, and complete the vicious circle with a left turn back onto Deer Creek Canyon Road.

How to get out-of-town guests out of the house: Put 'em on a bike and let 'em go. They'll be in good hands at Blazing Saddles, which is centrally located and close to the bike paths and offers an entire stable of new, state-of-the-art wheeled steeds, from trusty, serviceable mountain bikes to high-tech, full-suspension Stumpjumpers for hardened trail riders. Once your friends have chosen a mount, they can pick one of five planned itineraries, from an easy cycle along the Platte to Confluence Park to the much tougher and higher White Ranch ride; the outfit's Computrak system, a computerized map that's mounted right on the handlebars, will keep them from getting lost even as it recommends restaurants and attractions along the way. Ah. Now you can have the house to yourselves.
How to get out-of-town guests out of the house: Put 'em on a bike and let 'em go. They'll be in good hands at Blazing Saddles, which is centrally located and close to the bike paths and offers an entire stable of new, state-of-the-art wheeled steeds, from trusty, serviceable mountain bikes to high-tech, full-suspension Stumpjumpers for hardened trail riders. Once your friends have chosen a mount, they can pick one of five planned itineraries, from an easy cycle along the Platte to Confluence Park to the much tougher and higher White Ranch ride; the outfit's Computrak system, a computerized map that's mounted right on the handlebars, will keep them from getting lost even as it recommends restaurants and attractions along the way. Ah. Now you can have the house to yourselves.
Lynn Dexter and Patrick Gibbons are living proof that two heads -- and pairs of legs -- are better than one: Bike enthusiasts who decided the only way to ride together effectively was to go tandem, the couple opened their shop in reaction to the blank looks they were getting from folks selling what they call "half" bikes at other places. Tandem Cycle Works, one of the largest shops of its kind in the country, not only sells bicycles built for two exclusively, but also offers free adjustments on all bikes sold there, as well as a motherlode of friendly advice for tandem novices. It's double the fun.

Lynn Dexter and Patrick Gibbons are living proof that two heads -- and pairs of legs -- are better than one: Bike enthusiasts who decided the only way to ride together effectively was to go tandem, the couple opened their shop in reaction to the blank looks they were getting from folks selling what they call "half" bikes at other places. Tandem Cycle Works, one of the largest shops of its kind in the country, not only sells bicycles built for two exclusively, but also offers free adjustments on all bikes sold there, as well as a motherlode of friendly advice for tandem novices. It's double the fun.

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