Best place to catch a trout without leaving town

City Park

City Park's two lakes are continuously stocked with fish, generally trout. And the park is nearby, devoid of hazardous mountain roads and the other fishing folk are friendly -- parents teach their kids how to fish, and more skilled anglers try out their new rods and reels before heading to the mountain streams. And if you don't catch anything, there's a King Soopers not too far away.

Clement Park remains a beautiful facility, but its proximity to Columbine High School means that it evokes some painful memories for some, and it continues to attract a certain percentage of media types and other assorted voyeurs. Fortunately, the Ridge at West Meadows, a 140-acre facility north of Coal Mine near Dakota Ridge High School, offers many of the accoutrements that mark its more famous cousin: lots of soccer fields, a lake, a huge playground, and so on. Add to that a spectacular view of the foothills and a regular breeze perfect for kite flying, and you've got a place that offers recreation sans any unpleasant baggage.

Clement Park remains a beautiful facility, but its proximity to Columbine High School means that it evokes some painful memories for some, and it continues to attract a certain percentage of media types and other assorted voyeurs. Fortunately, the Ridge at West Meadows, a 140-acre facility north of Coal Mine near Dakota Ridge High School, offers many of the accoutrements that mark its more famous cousin: lots of soccer fields, a lake, a huge playground, and so on. Add to that a spectacular view of the foothills and a regular breeze perfect for kite flying, and you've got a place that offers recreation sans any unpleasant baggage.

Fun City
What a difference a few million bucks can make. Formerly known as FunPlex, this facility is in the midst of a major overhaul -- and if the bowling alley is any indication, the completed work will be something to see. The alley's interior has been remade in kitschy retro-'50s fashion, complete with leopard-print stools and a central bar dubbed the Lucky Strike. Yet there are modern touches as well -- namely giant video screens mounted over each lane and a booming sound system, both of which transform the game into a rock-and-roll experience. The price to bowl is a bit steep, particularly on weekends, but people who enjoy a party atmosphere won't complain. This place has style to spare.

What a difference a few million bucks can make. Formerly known as FunPlex, this facility is in the midst of a major overhaul -- and if the bowling alley is any indication, the completed work will be something to see. The alley's interior has been remade in kitschy retro-'50s fashion, complete with leopard-print stools and a central bar dubbed the Lucky Strike. Yet there are modern touches as well -- namely giant video screens mounted over each lane and a booming sound system, both of which transform the game into a rock-and-roll experience. The price to bowl is a bit steep, particularly on weekends, but people who enjoy a party atmosphere won't complain. This place has style to spare.

When Ralph Cramden went bowling, he didn't go to some glitzy joint filled with video games and screaming kids. He went to a place like Sport Bowl, a classic old bowling alley on South Broadway, where the biggest concession to children is the rubber-baby-buggy-bumpers -- specifically, two padded alleys, designed for little kids and bigger ones who can't stand the thought of throwing a gutter ball. The amenities here are sparse, but they're choice: a decent billiards room, good hours (it's open twelve to twelve), league specials and midnight bowling -- and a bar where you can brag about your game after you've thrown that strike.

When Ralph Cramden went bowling, he didn't go to some glitzy joint filled with video games and screaming kids. He went to a place like Sport Bowl, a classic old bowling alley on South Broadway, where the biggest concession to children is the rubber-baby-buggy-bumpers -- specifically, two padded alleys, designed for little kids and bigger ones who can't stand the thought of throwing a gutter ball. The amenities here are sparse, but they're choice: a decent billiards room, good hours (it's open twelve to twelve), league specials and midnight bowling -- and a bar where you can brag about your game after you've thrown that strike.

Dee Chandler and Beau Blakemore, guides on the Gunslingers, Ghosts and Gold Walking Tours, strolled into their chosen profession as tourists themselves, so be assured: They've done their homework, though they've probably worn out more then a few pairs of shoes in the process. But it's paid off -- Chandler and Blakemore work with an arsenal of funny, gory and often creepy yarns from Denver's rough-and-tumble past. If you're a native, chances are you've heard or read some of the stories, but they're perfect fare for visitors to modern Denver, which bears little or no resemblance to the one Chandler and Blakemore evoke.

Dee Chandler and Beau Blakemore, guides on the Gunslingers, Ghosts and Gold Walking Tours, strolled into their chosen profession as tourists themselves, so be assured: They've done their homework, though they've probably worn out more then a few pairs of shoes in the process. But it's paid off -- Chandler and Blakemore work with an arsenal of funny, gory and often creepy yarns from Denver's rough-and-tumble past. If you're a native, chances are you've heard or read some of the stories, but they're perfect fare for visitors to modern Denver, which bears little or no resemblance to the one Chandler and Blakemore evoke.

If the Broncos hope to regain their Super Bowl form after a miserable 6-10 year, the 1998 league MVP must rebound from the leg injury that cost him virtually all of last season. Hard-running Terrell Davis is the best in the game when he's healthy, consistently rolling up 100-yard totals and taking pressure off Bronco quarterbacks not named Elway. An added bonus: Note Davis's veteran influence on young Bronco ball carrier (and fellow Georgia grad) Olandis Gary, whose star began to rise in 1999.

Readers' choice: Terrell Davis

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