You may get distracted stroking your three-footer for par, so spectacular are the red-rock vistas at Arrowhead Golf Club. But that's the price you pay for playing this gorgeous and challenging Littleton layout designed in 1972 by the estimable Robert Trent Jones Jr. The wildlife at large among the traps and lakes includes foxes, bear and deer, and unless you're pretty accurate with the sticks, a high percentage of your shots may go wild, too. One of the finest, most beautiful public golf courses in the nation -- with hefty greens fees to match.
Arrowhead Golf Club
You may get distracted stroking your three-footer for par, so spectacular are the red-rock vistas at Arrowhead Golf Club. But that's the price you pay for playing this gorgeous and challenging Littleton layout designed in 1972 by the estimable Robert Trent Jones Jr. The wildlife at large among the traps and lakes includes foxes, bear and deer, and unless you're pretty accurate with the sticks, a high percentage of your shots may go wild, too. One of the finest, most beautiful public golf courses in the nation -- with hefty greens fees to match.
Shreveport, Louisiana's David Toms, one of the best-kept secrets on the PGA Tour, led last summer's Sprint International at Castle Pines the entire way -- until the sixteenth hole of the final round. There, Toms scored an egregious triple bogey and gave up the lead to hard-charging David Duval. But Toms wasn't done. On seventeen, the long-hitting pro pulled himself together, rolled a delicate chip shot down a nerve-shattering greenside hill and left his ball within a few feet of the cup. Toms coolly sank his birdie putt and put the tournament in his pocket right there, joining such better-known international winners as Greg Norman, Davis Love III, Phil Mickelson and Vijay Singh.
Shreveport, Louisiana's David Toms, one of the best-kept secrets on the PGA Tour, led last summer's Sprint International at Castle Pines the entire way -- until the sixteenth hole of the final round. There, Toms scored an egregious triple bogey and gave up the lead to hard-charging David Duval. But Toms wasn't done. On seventeen, the long-hitting pro pulled himself together, rolled a delicate chip shot down a nerve-shattering greenside hill and left his ball within a few feet of the cup. Toms coolly sank his birdie putt and put the tournament in his pocket right there, joining such better-known international winners as Greg Norman, Davis Love III, Phil Mickelson and Vijay Singh.
The city of Denver owns dozens of park tennis courts that you can play on for free, but if you have a couple bucks burning a hole in your pocket it's more than worth the price of admission to stop by the Gates Tennis Center in the Cherry Creek neighborhood. For $4 an hour per court (that's $1.25 each for a doubles match), you get your choice of twenty hard-surface courts (resurfaced this year), seven of which are well-lit for night play. Gates's center court, sunken for better viewing, is one of the best venues in the city, public or private. The tennis center also has six teaching pros on staff, and can string rackets on site.
Gates Tennis Center
The city of Denver owns dozens of park tennis courts that you can play on for free, but if you have a couple bucks burning a hole in your pocket it's more than worth the price of admission to stop by the Gates Tennis Center in the Cherry Creek neighborhood. For $4 an hour per court (that's $1.25 each for a doubles match), you get your choice of twenty hard-surface courts (resurfaced this year), seven of which are well-lit for night play. Gates's center court, sunken for better viewing, is one of the best venues in the city, public or private. The tennis center also has six teaching pros on staff, and can string rackets on site.
This well-appointed club south of Denver has five outdoor courts that are open year-round, but the real draw is the seven scrupulously maintained indoor clay courts. Naturally, such luxury doesn't come cheap; initiation is $300 ($350 for a couple), with additional monthly dues of $107 ($161). That's more than $1,500 per year to swat around a tennis ball, but if you love the high bounces and sliding style of clay, it's well worth the cost.
Greenwood Athletic Club
This well-appointed club south of Denver has five outdoor courts that are open year-round, but the real draw is the seven scrupulously maintained indoor clay courts. Naturally, such luxury doesn't come cheap; initiation is $300 ($350 for a couple), with additional monthly dues of $107 ($161). That's more than $1,500 per year to swat around a tennis ball, but if you love the high bounces and sliding style of clay, it's well worth the cost.
With amateur tennis, any player can beat another of similar ability on a given day. But Loehr has shown amazing consistency on the Denver club tennis scene. Last year he won both the Denver Open Tournament and the Colorado State Open, an unusual enough accomplishment on its own. But he also won the state tournament in 1998, as well. That means that this July, Loehr will be aiming for his third consecutive state championship -- a feat that, according to the Colorado Tennis Association, has never before been accomplished.
With amateur tennis, any player can beat another of similar ability on a given day. But Loehr has shown amazing consistency on the Denver club tennis scene. Last year he won both the Denver Open Tournament and the Colorado State Open, an unusual enough accomplishment on its own. But he also won the state tournament in 1998, as well. That means that this July, Loehr will be aiming for his third consecutive state championship -- a feat that, according to the Colorado Tennis Association, has never before been accomplished.

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