This well-appointed club south of Denver has five outdoor courts that are open year-round, but the real draw is the seven scrupulously maintained indoor clay courts. Naturally, such luxury doesn't come cheap; initiation is $300 ($350 for a couple), with additional monthly dues of $107 ($161). That's more than $1,500 per year to swat around a tennis ball, but if you love the high bounces and sliding style of clay, it's well worth the cost.
Greenwood Athletic Club
This well-appointed club south of Denver has five outdoor courts that are open year-round, but the real draw is the seven scrupulously maintained indoor clay courts. Naturally, such luxury doesn't come cheap; initiation is $300 ($350 for a couple), with additional monthly dues of $107 ($161). That's more than $1,500 per year to swat around a tennis ball, but if you love the high bounces and sliding style of clay, it's well worth the cost.
With amateur tennis, any player can beat another of similar ability on a given day. But Loehr has shown amazing consistency on the Denver club tennis scene. Last year he won both the Denver Open Tournament and the Colorado State Open, an unusual enough accomplishment on its own. But he also won the state tournament in 1998, as well. That means that this July, Loehr will be aiming for his third consecutive state championship -- a feat that, according to the Colorado Tennis Association, has never before been accomplished.
With amateur tennis, any player can beat another of similar ability on a given day. But Loehr has shown amazing consistency on the Denver club tennis scene. Last year he won both the Denver Open Tournament and the Colorado State Open, an unusual enough accomplishment on its own. But he also won the state tournament in 1998, as well. That means that this July, Loehr will be aiming for his third consecutive state championship -- a feat that, according to the Colorado Tennis Association, has never before been accomplished.
Recent breakthroughs in swimming-pool technologies almost dictate that the best swimming pool be the newest. Standing at the recently opened Wheat Ridge Community Center pool, surrounded by so much aquatic flash and dazzle, it's hard to imagine what people did in the six-lane cement ponds of yesteryear. But this is a fitness center, and quite a workout can be had by running from one aquatic attraction to the next. First hit the inner tubes by the lazy river for some paddling exercises, then try a cool-down on the water-fountain spray features, followed by a brisk wallowing in the baby pool and a series of reps in the Jacuzzi. And just off the interior sunbathing courtyard, a curious six-lane cement pond has been built where old-timers and history buffs can try their hands at "swimming."
Recent breakthroughs in swimming-pool technologies almost dictate that the best swimming pool be the newest. Standing at the recently opened Wheat Ridge Community Center pool, surrounded by so much aquatic flash and dazzle, it's hard to imagine what people did in the six-lane cement ponds of yesteryear. But this is a fitness center, and quite a workout can be had by running from one aquatic attraction to the next. First hit the inner tubes by the lazy river for some paddling exercises, then try a cool-down on the water-fountain spray features, followed by a brisk wallowing in the baby pool and a series of reps in the Jacuzzi. And just off the interior sunbathing courtyard, a curious six-lane cement pond has been built where old-timers and history buffs can try their hands at "swimming."
Climbing walls have become a hip form of exercise, and there are a growing number of them in Denver on which you can test your perpendicular prowess. (Not included in this list: the wall at the new downtown REI store, more display than challenge.) Yet there's something about scaling an indoor face that violates the spirit of rock climbing. So save your money and head west to the sheer walls off of Route 8 just a few yards east of downtown Morrison. The rocks face south, so handholds are warm most of the year. The routes are short enough that you don't need to haul around ropes and protection (an alert spotter will do), and there are an infinite number of moves to try, from simple to ridiculous. Best of all, you'll get a tan at the same time.

Climbing walls have become a hip form of exercise, and there are a growing number of them in Denver on which you can test your perpendicular prowess. (Not included in this list: the wall at the new downtown REI store, more display than challenge.) Yet there's something about scaling an indoor face that violates the spirit of rock climbing. So save your money and head west to the sheer walls off of Route 8 just a few yards east of downtown Morrison. The rocks face south, so handholds are warm most of the year. The routes are short enough that you don't need to haul around ropes and protection (an alert spotter will do), and there are an infinite number of moves to try, from simple to ridiculous. Best of all, you'll get a tan at the same time.

What tribulations hath the post-Elway era wrought? Unceremoniously demoted in the 1999 pre-season by coach Mike Shanahan, former Bronco starting quarterback Bubby Brister fussed and fumed, then considered his options, then decided to stay on as young Brian Griese's backup out of loyalty to his teammates. But the fiery Louisianan's animus for Shanahan was evident: Said Bubby: "When I had a level head and thought about it, I said I can't walk out on [Bill Romanowski], [Ed] McCaffrey and Brian. But I know if it was a one-on-one card game and Mike dealt me that hand, I would probably do like they did back in the day." Fortunately for all concerned, Brister kept his Colt in the holster.

What tribulations hath the post-Elway era wrought? Unceremoniously demoted in the 1999 pre-season by coach Mike Shanahan, former Bronco starting quarterback Bubby Brister fussed and fumed, then considered his options, then decided to stay on as young Brian Griese's backup out of loyalty to his teammates. But the fiery Louisianan's animus for Shanahan was evident: Said Bubby: "When I had a level head and thought about it, I said I can't walk out on [Bill Romanowski], [Ed] McCaffrey and Brian. But I know if it was a one-on-one card game and Mike dealt me that hand, I would probably do like they did back in the day." Fortunately for all concerned, Brister kept his Colt in the holster.

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