You haven't really seen softball until you've seen it played by athletes in wheelchairs -- it's a whole new ballgame demanding ample space and smooth ground for all the sharp turns and attendant maneuvers required. But the Colorado Rockies Wheelchair Softball League is covered: The Colorado Rockies baseball organization not only provides monetary support, it's also opened up the north parking lot at Coors Field for league practices, games and clinics. Meanwhile the League, sponsored by Paralyzed Veterans of America Mountain States Chapter, has grown from three members to 500 in only five years, making it the largest such organization in the country.

You haven't really seen softball until you've seen it played by athletes in wheelchairs -- it's a whole new ballgame demanding ample space and smooth ground for all the sharp turns and attendant maneuvers required. But the Colorado Rockies Wheelchair Softball League is covered: The Colorado Rockies baseball organization not only provides monetary support, it's also opened up the north parking lot at Coors Field for league practices, games and clinics. Meanwhile the League, sponsored by Paralyzed Veterans of America Mountain States Chapter, has grown from three members to 500 in only five years, making it the largest such organization in the country.

Dan Issel's largely forgettable Nuggets continue to be anchored by sharpshooting forward Antonio McDyess, who ranked ninth in the NBA last season in field-goal percentage (.507) and sixteenth in rebounds (8.5 per game). The franchise player, Dice averaged 19.1 points per game, but his biggest night probably came in a 115-114 overtime win against the L.A. Clippers on April 15, when he logged 30 points and a career-high 21 rebounds. As McDyess goes, so go the Nuggets.

Readers' choice: Antonio McDyess

Dan Issel's largely forgettable Nuggets continue to be anchored by sharpshooting forward Antonio McDyess, who ranked ninth in the NBA last season in field-goal percentage (.507) and sixteenth in rebounds (8.5 per game). The franchise player, Dice averaged 19.1 points per game, but his biggest night probably came in a 115-114 overtime win against the L.A. Clippers on April 15, when he logged 30 points and a career-high 21 rebounds. As McDyess goes, so go the Nuggets.

Readers' choice: Antonio McDyess

Patrick Roy's net-minding lapses and Joe Sakic's vanishing act in the Western Conference finals reminded Colorado Avalanche fans that the master of finesse, Peter Forsberg, is still the best player on a club well-stocked with -- excuse the expression, Dallas-haters -- stars. Always a great passer and playmaker, the former Swedish Olympic standout showed more willingness to shoot the puck in 1999-2000, and he remains the essential nucleus of a Stanley Cup-contending team that has managed to underachieve two years running. If 2001 is the time, Peter's the Man.

Readers' choice: Peter Forsberg

Patrick Roy's net-minding lapses and Joe Sakic's vanishing act in the Western Conference finals reminded Colorado Avalanche fans that the master of finesse, Peter Forsberg, is still the best player on a club well-stocked with -- excuse the expression, Dallas-haters -- stars. Always a great passer and playmaker, the former Swedish Olympic standout showed more willingness to shoot the puck in 1999-2000, and he remains the essential nucleus of a Stanley Cup-contending team that has managed to underachieve two years running. If 2001 is the time, Peter's the Man.

Readers' choice: Peter Forsberg

After dreaming through more than half a season of mediocrity, a listless Colorado Avalanche club was suddenly awakened by the arrival March 6 of two veteran Bostonians, Dave Andreychuk and Ray Bourque, who reminded their new teammates what they had going -- a rare shot at the Stanley Cup. Bourque, in particular, set the Avs aflame. In twenty years as a Bruin, he had never won a championship, and his teammates visibly elevated their game after he got inside their heads. The Avs cruised into the NHL playoffs, and defenseman Bourque's mysterious injury in a game against Detroit (a leg bruise? a knee sprain?) sharpened their focus to the killing point. The best news: Bourque has re-signed with the Avs for next year.

After dreaming through more than half a season of mediocrity, a listless Colorado Avalanche club was suddenly awakened by the arrival March 6 of two veteran Bostonians, Dave Andreychuk and Ray Bourque, who reminded their new teammates what they had going -- a rare shot at the Stanley Cup. Bourque, in particular, set the Avs aflame. In twenty years as a Bruin, he had never won a championship, and his teammates visibly elevated their game after he got inside their heads. The Avs cruised into the NHL playoffs, and defenseman Bourque's mysterious injury in a game against Detroit (a leg bruise? a knee sprain?) sharpened their focus to the killing point. The best news: Bourque has re-signed with the Avs for next year.

The author of the original "Stick a Bourque in 'em!" banner remains unidentified, but the sentiment rang every fan's bell at the Pepsi Center as the Colorado Avalanche put the finishing touches on a badly outclassed Phoenix Coyotes team in the first round of the NHL playoffs. The Bourque the Avs stuck in the Coyotes (because they were cooked) was, of course, veteran defenseman Raymond Bourque, newly acquired from Boston and Colorado's most vivid inspiration. The ticket-buyers weren't alone: Every sportswriter in town envied such peerless wit.

The author of the original "Stick a Bourque in 'em!" banner remains unidentified, but the sentiment rang every fan's bell at the Pepsi Center as the Colorado Avalanche put the finishing touches on a badly outclassed Phoenix Coyotes team in the first round of the NHL playoffs. The Bourque the Avs stuck in the Coyotes (because they were cooked) was, of course, veteran defenseman Raymond Bourque, newly acquired from Boston and Colorado's most vivid inspiration. The ticket-buyers weren't alone: Every sportswriter in town envied such peerless wit.

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