For whatever sins you committed Saturday night, the Old Stone Church offers the easiest penance going: a warm, cozy Sunday brunch complete with innovative dishes and fresh-squeezed OJ. Start with a mimosa and an exploration of the bread basket, whose contents include such homemade delights as focaccia, icing-gooey cinnamon rolls, mini poppyseed muffins, cranberry-filled scones and homemade croissants. But you'll want to save plenty of space for the enormous entrees -- such temptations as corned beef hash with sweet potatoes, snow crab au gratin, and huevos rancheros with a chipotle cream sauce. The restaurant's soothing atmosphere is conducive to a relaxing repast, and service comes with a smile. Amen to that.

For whatever sins you committed Saturday night, the Old Stone Church offers the easiest penance going: a warm, cozy Sunday brunch complete with innovative dishes and fresh-squeezed OJ. Start with a mimosa and an exploration of the bread basket, whose contents include such homemade delights as focaccia, icing-gooey cinnamon rolls, mini poppyseed muffins, cranberry-filled scones and homemade croissants. But you'll want to save plenty of space for the enormous entrees -- such temptations as corned beef hash with sweet potatoes, snow crab au gratin, and huevos rancheros with a chipotle cream sauce. The restaurant's soothing atmosphere is conducive to a relaxing repast, and service comes with a smile. Amen to that.

No one's crying fowl over DeLorenzo's. This gourmet takeout shop knows how to do chicken right: Drench it in lemon juice, sprinkle it with fresh parsley and a smattering of pepper, and then slow-roast it in a rotisserie oven until the skin is crackly crisp and soaked with juices. When you bite into this bird (a half per order), more juices squirt out, revealing oh-so-tender breast and thigh meat within. Paired with a pile of buttery skin-on potatoes mashed until light and fluffy, this dish really flies.
No one's crying fowl over DeLorenzo's. This gourmet takeout shop knows how to do chicken right: Drench it in lemon juice, sprinkle it with fresh parsley and a smattering of pepper, and then slow-roast it in a rotisserie oven until the skin is crackly crisp and soaked with juices. When you bite into this bird (a half per order), more juices squirt out, revealing oh-so-tender breast and thigh meat within. Paired with a pile of buttery skin-on potatoes mashed until light and fluffy, this dish really flies.
Spread the word: From 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, Thai Landing offers the best lunch buffet in town. Just $4.60 buys this all-you-can-eat feast, which always includes at least one of Thai Landing's complex curries, along with pad Thai, chicken wings, egg rolls, several vegetable dishes, fried and steamed rice, a salad bar and a soup (hope for the sweet-and-spicy coconut). Load up a plate, grab a seat in one of the comfy booths, and pray you can squeeze your stuffed self back out when you're done.
Little India
Westword
Spread the word: From 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, Thai Landing offers the best lunch buffet in town. Just $4.60 buys this all-you-can-eat feast, which always includes at least one of Thai Landing's complex curries, along with pad Thai, chicken wings, egg rolls, several vegetable dishes, fried and steamed rice, a salad bar and a soup (hope for the sweet-and-spicy coconut). Load up a plate, grab a seat in one of the comfy booths, and pray you can squeeze your stuffed self back out when you're done.
The Saucy Noodle is back, and it's better than ever. Neither rain nor snow nor last spring's restaurant-gutting fire could put an end to this Denver institution. Today the Saucy Noodle is run by Erin and Nathan Markham -- original owner Sam Badis, Erin's dad, passed away five years ago -- and it has both an expanded space and a snazzy new look. But one thing remains a constant: the red sauce, the same quintessential version the kitchen's been cooking up since 1964. Sweet and smooth, with a faintly tart undertone and a rich, simmered-all-day consistency, the red goes with anything, but we particularly like it ladled over a plate of homemade spaghetti noodles, thick, chewy and al dente all the way, with a coupla fat meatballs on the side and a basket of bread. Is that Italian? You bet your noodle.
The Saucy Noodle
Molly Martin
The Saucy Noodle is back, and it's better than ever. Neither rain nor snow nor last spring's restaurant-gutting fire could put an end to this Denver institution. Today the Saucy Noodle is run by Erin and Nathan Markham -- original owner Sam Badis, Erin's dad, passed away five years ago -- and it has both an expanded space and a snazzy new look. But one thing remains a constant: the red sauce, the same quintessential version the kitchen's been cooking up since 1964. Sweet and smooth, with a faintly tart undertone and a rich, simmered-all-day consistency, the red goes with anything, but we particularly like it ladled over a plate of homemade spaghetti noodles, thick, chewy and al dente all the way, with a coupla fat meatballs on the side and a basket of bread. Is that Italian? You bet your noodle.
It's 3 a.m. You're tired and you're hungry. You don't want a Grand Slam -- you want some home cooking that'll calm your frazzled nerves. You want the real McCoys. Open 24-7 and operating diner-style, McCoys specializes in good, inexpensive comfort food: country-style fried chicken and mashed potatoes covered with pepper-speckled white gravy, a remarkably tasty plate of spaghetti with meatballs, and, of course, breakfast anytime, including big, fat cinnamon rolls with an icing roof. Really in need of comfort? Try the pot roast, drowning in dense, salty brown gravy and so cooked down it's like baby food for adults. As you spoon up some sustenance, you can watch big people working on their late-night relationship issues.
McCoy's Restaurant
Mark Antonation
It's 3 a.m. You're tired and you're hungry. You don't want a Grand Slam -- you want some home cooking that'll calm your frazzled nerves. You want the real McCoys. Open 24-7 and operating diner-style, McCoys specializes in good, inexpensive comfort food: country-style fried chicken and mashed potatoes covered with pepper-speckled white gravy, a remarkably tasty plate of spaghetti with meatballs, and, of course, breakfast anytime, including big, fat cinnamon rolls with an icing roof. Really in need of comfort? Try the pot roast, drowning in dense, salty brown gravy and so cooked down it's like baby food for adults. As you spoon up some sustenance, you can watch big people working on their late-night relationship issues.

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