Best Place to Score With a Fifty-Something Whose Ex-Spouse Got the Mercedes

D�jà Vu

There they sit, mostly at Deja Vu's bar, well-manicured and well-lubed, looking for someone with whom to lament their lot in life and talk tax shelters. Their purses (or their money clips) match their shoes (or their bolo ties), and they look longingly at the bar menu before announcing that the Atkins diet has been a godsend. Food of choice: martini, dry, with many olives to relieve sexual tension.

Best Place to Score With a Fifty-Something Whose Ex-Spouse Got the Mercedes

Déjà Vu

There they sit, mostly at Deja Vu's bar, well-manicured and well-lubed, looking for someone with whom to lament their lot in life and talk tax shelters. Their purses (or their money clips) match their shoes (or their bolo ties), and they look longingly at the bar menu before announcing that the Atkins diet has been a godsend. Food of choice: martini, dry, with many olives to relieve sexual tension.

Del Frisco's Double Eagle is still the meat to beat. At this classy steakhouse, the prime, dry-aged, cut-to-order beef is inevitably what's for dinner. To go with it, order one of the substantial sides -- the skillet potatoes and onions will put hair on your chest -- along with a bottle of wine from Del Frisco's well-stocked cellar and a knock-out dessert. Your steak will arrive perfectly cooked and impeccably served in an atmosphere that's at once elegant and amiable. And if you get to watch a Bronco pulling up steaks at the next table, so much the better.
Del Frisco's Double Eagle is still the meat to beat. At this classy steakhouse, the prime, dry-aged, cut-to-order beef is inevitably what's for dinner. To go with it, order one of the substantial sides -- the skillet potatoes and onions will put hair on your chest -- along with a bottle of wine from Del Frisco's well-stocked cellar and a knock-out dessert. Your steak will arrive perfectly cooked and impeccably served in an atmosphere that's at once elegant and amiable. And if you get to watch a Bronco pulling up steaks at the next table, so much the better.
La Cueva
Courtesy La Cueva Colfax Facebook
Man does not live by tortilla alone. For example, there's also tequila. Tequila that's twenty years old, tequila that's a hundred years old, tequila that comes in that familiar Jose Cuervo bottle, tequila that comes in containers worthy of museum status. The tequila just keeps coming to La Cueva, a 27-year-old restaurant on East Colfax that welcomed in the millennium by adding a trendy tequila-and-margarita bar to its already substantial lineup of authentic Mexican fare. The dishes come from Norma Nuez, and she's justifiably proud of them -- so much so that she's produced a book of her recipes.
Man does not live by tortilla alone. For example, there's also tequila. Tequila that's twenty years old, tequila that's a hundred years old, tequila that comes in that familiar Jose Cuervo bottle, tequila that comes in containers worthy of museum status. The tequila just keeps coming to La Cueva, a 27-year-old restaurant on East Colfax that welcomed in the millennium by adding a trendy tequila-and-margarita bar to its already substantial lineup of authentic Mexican fare. The dishes come from Norma Nuñez, and she's justifiably proud of them -- so much so that she's produced a book of her recipes.
Although it seems like Benny Armas, owner of Benny's Restaurante & Cantina, has been around forever (he started in the kitchen at the late, great Oak Alley Inn twenty years ago, and today his namesake place has lines out the door), his chips are always fresh and his salsa always sassy. A second after you reply "yes" to what are often the server's only words of English -- "chips and salsa?" -- a basket lands on your table, full of freshly fried and lightly salted tortilla chips, accompanied by a bowl of tongue-tinglingly spicy salsa. We'd willingly pay for this starter -- and, in fact, Benny's used to charge $1.50 for chips and salsa -- but today it's given out gratis. Gracias.
Although it seems like Benny Armas, owner of Benny's Restaurante & Cantina, has been around forever (he started in the kitchen at the late, great Oak Alley Inn twenty years ago, and today his namesake place has lines out the door), his chips are always fresh and his salsa always sassy. A second after you reply "yes" to what are often the server's only words of English -- "chips and salsa?" -- a basket lands on your table, full of freshly fried and lightly salted tortilla chips, accompanied by a bowl of tongue-tinglingly spicy salsa. We'd willingly pay for this starter -- and, in fact, Benny's used to charge $1.50 for chips and salsa -- but today it's given out gratis. Gracias.
The Burrito Company
If you have a big hunger and not much time, head for the Burrito Co. All day long, people keep pulling up to this takeout-only spot on Santa Fe. They get in line, choose from dozens of possible orders (our favorites all involve the succulent shredded beef), wait about two minutes -- and then collect their orders at the handy service window. Each burrito comes individually, and tightly, wrapped in foil, letting off a puff of steam when it's undone and consumed -- often in the parking lot, usually within seconds. Remember to pack out your garbage.

If you have a big hunger and not much time, head for the Burrito Co. All day long, people keep pulling up to this takeout-only spot on Santa Fe. They get in line, choose from dozens of possible orders (our favorites all involve the succulent shredded beef), wait about two minutes -- and then collect their orders at the handy service window. Each burrito comes individually, and tightly, wrapped in foil, letting off a puff of steam when it's undone and consumed -- often in the parking lot, usually within seconds. Remember to pack out your garbage.

Best Of Denver®

Best Of