Sometimes you don't feel like getting all gussied up and heading out for a Sunday brunch that's going to require loosening your belt just to finish the meal and then downing seven Tums afterward. Sometimes it's enough to go somewhere that's easy on the eyes, heart and pocketbook. And those are the times we head to the newly remodeled 35th Avenue Grill at the Park Hill Golf Club. Get a table by the window for a view of the golf course, then amble over to the made-to-order stations, which offer omelettes and Belgian waffles. Add some fresh fruit, bacon and eggs, homemade pastries, and biscuits and gravy -- and don't forget the honey-baked ham or fried chicken. After you've hoovered through that, finish things off with a slice of made-from-scratch pie. The cost for all of this all-you-can-eat extravagance? A mere $9.95. For another three bucks, you can take advantage of the make-your-own Bloody Mary bar, which offers all the mixes and veggies you need to make an eye-opener -- if your eyes haven't already been opened wide by this unbelievable brunch deal.

Remember, time is money -- which is why so many businesspeople bank on the lunchtime buffet at 1876. The spread is a real deal: $10.99 buys all you can eat of whatever cuisine is featured that day (sometimes an assortment of Mexican dishes, sometimes Italian), as well as a pass by the make-your-own sandwich board and two soups. But the true marvel is the array of salads: inventive (try chunks of marinated ham with green peppers and onions), absolutely fresh (crisp leaves of grass-green romaine) and downright luxurious (hearts of palm). Although the attentive servers are careful to keep glasses full and dishes clear, there's no need to wait for a waiter to outline the specials or bring the check -- or to worry about that same waiter eavesdropping on your talk while you power munch. A favorite for moguls on the go.

Remember, time is money -- which is why so many businesspeople bank on the lunchtime buffet at 1876. The spread is a real deal: $10.99 buys all you can eat of whatever cuisine is featured that day (sometimes an assortment of Mexican dishes, sometimes Italian), as well as a pass by the make-your-own sandwich board and two soups. But the true marvel is the array of salads: inventive (try chunks of marinated ham with green peppers and onions), absolutely fresh (crisp leaves of grass-green romaine) and downright luxurious (hearts of palm). Although the attentive servers are careful to keep glasses full and dishes clear, there's no need to wait for a waiter to outline the specials or bring the check -- or to worry about that same waiter eavesdropping on your talk while you power munch. A favorite for moguls on the go.

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