Nearing completion on the University of Denver campus is the glitzy Alan Gerry Cable Telecommunications Building, which will house the National Cable Television Center and Museum, a nonprofit institution that's the brainchild of the late Bob Magness, founder of Telecommunications Inc. Any new building would have needed a distinctive look in order to stand up to the visually emphatic Ritchie Center so close by; luckily, this cable complex qualifies. Denver's RNL Design is responsible for the quirky structure, with its rusticated stone and eyeball windows; appropriately enough, it looks like something out of The Flintstones. And the building's future is secure -- already the museum has attracted tens of millions of dollars in donations. After all, those cable moguls can afford the best.

Nearing completion on the University of Denver campus is the glitzy Alan Gerry Cable Telecommunications Building, which will house the National Cable Television Center and Museum, a nonprofit institution that's the brainchild of the late Bob Magness, founder of Telecommunications Inc. Any new building would have needed a distinctive look in order to stand up to the visually emphatic Ritchie Center so close by; luckily, this cable complex qualifies. Denver's RNL Design is responsible for the quirky structure, with its rusticated stone and eyeball windows; appropriately enough, it looks like something out of The Flintstones. And the building's future is secure -- already the museum has attracted tens of millions of dollars in donations. After all, those cable moguls can afford the best.

It's no surprise that Tom Green, the best writer among area sportscasters, has announced that he's leaving Channel 7 in a matter of months; when a program is ratings-challenged, as this one is, the team that puts it together tends to fragment. And that's unfortunate in this case, since the structure of KMGH's ten o'clock newscast is sound, its reports are ambitious, anchors Ann Trujillo and Mitch Jelniker are the best in town at getting out of the way of a story, and Green and weathercaster Marty Coniglio are very good at what they do. Catch them while you can.
It's no surprise that Tom Green, the best writer among area sportscasters, has announced that he's leaving Channel 7 in a matter of months; when a program is ratings-challenged, as this one is, the team that puts it together tends to fragment. And that's unfortunate in this case, since the structure of KMGH's ten o'clock newscast is sound, its reports are ambitious, anchors Ann Trujillo and Mitch Jelniker are the best in town at getting out of the way of a story, and Green and weathercaster Marty Coniglio are very good at what they do. Catch them while you can.
One evening early this legislative session, former state representative and current lobbyist Betty Neale was stopped at the State Capitol by a patrolman who thought she looked suspicious -- but, hey, she's a lobbyist! To save Neale (and its own bureaucratic self) from future embarrassments, the Colorado State Patrol subsequently issued Neale a tag that makes her status official: "The Honorable Betty Neale, former state representative, City and County of Denver -- Official Loitering Pass."
One evening early this legislative session, former state representative and current lobbyist Betty Neale was stopped at the State Capitol by a patrolman who thought she looked suspicious -- but, hey, she's a lobbyist! To save Neale (and its own bureaucratic self) from future embarrassments, the Colorado State Patrol subsequently issued Neale a tag that makes her status official: "The Honorable Betty Neale, former state representative, City and County of Denver -- Official Loitering Pass."
In October, the Denver Post was struck by a flood of gaffes -- and in an effort to stem the flow, staffers assembled to discuss the problem. After that meeting, managing editor for news Larry Burrough thanked attendees for their contributions to the session with an e-mail. The rub? The memo itself contained several errors, including the sentence, "It is notably that most of the mistakes were avoidable, that is to say that many of the mistake were about information we've written about before." Explains a lot, doesn't it?

In October, the Denver Post was struck by a flood of gaffes -- and in an effort to stem the flow, staffers assembled to discuss the problem. After that meeting, managing editor for news Larry Burrough thanked attendees for their contributions to the session with an e-mail. The rub? The memo itself contained several errors, including the sentence, "It is notably that most of the mistakes were avoidable, that is to say that many of the mistake were about information we've written about before." Explains a lot, doesn't it?

Best Insult of the Rocky Mountain News in the Denver Post

Written by Chuck Green

In a September 18 column, Chuck Green, who's done more crowing about the Post's JOA victory than anyone this side of Dean Singleton, wrote that he'd never considered switching to the Rocky Mountain News during his time in newspapering for a simple reason: "Why work for a bunch of liars and thieves when you can fight on the side of goodness and virtue -- and come out the winner, too?"

Best Development to Come Out of the News-Post Joint Operating Agreement

Comics

Quit the funny business! The newspaper war's over, and the terms of the settlement make readers the undisputed victors in one area: comics. Come April, the Denver Post will boast the largest Sunday comics section in the country, since it's adding the Rocky Mountain News's former lineup to its own on that day. (The News will return the favor by running the Post's comics on Saturday -- but those aren't the big, four-color Sunday funnies.) You might not give a hoot about Willy 'n' Ethel, much less that fusspot Nancy. But for many readers, comic strips are the most important part of their Sunday paper -- and they complain long and hard whenever the dailies fool around with them. Now, though, it won't be a matter of one paper stealing Garfield from the other -- they'll share weekend custody of the curmudgeonly cat. But since the Post won the right to print the town's only Sunday rag, that's where you'll find the lollapalooza of laughs -- everything from A (Annie, Little Orphan) to Z (Zippy the Pinhead). It's double the pleasure, double the funnies.

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