Former Denver Bronco Mark Schlereth, the man who's had more knee surgeries than any other human, has been filling in semi-regularly for Dave Logan on The Sports Zoo, KOA's afternoon-drive staple, and is proving to be just as reliable off the field as he was on. He's an amusing lug who doesn't mind making fun of himself or others when the occasion warrants. The guy's got a future behind the microphone -- a career that, fortunately, won't do any more damage to his patellas.
Former Denver Bronco Mark Schlereth, the man who's had more knee surgeries than any other human, has been filling in semi-regularly for Dave Logan on The Sports Zoo, KOA's afternoon-drive staple, and is proving to be just as reliable off the field as he was on. He's an amusing lug who doesn't mind making fun of himself or others when the occasion warrants. The guy's got a future behind the microphone -- a career that, fortunately, won't do any more damage to his patellas.
The thinking man's sports yakker, Sandy Clough has such a proclivity for multisyllabic discourse that the weekday morning show he co-hosts with Mike Evans frequently offers "The Sandy Clough Word of the Day" as a way for listeners to pump up their word power. Granted, Clough can be overbearing, but he's also serious and incisive, and provides a welcome contrast to the typical dumb-jock babble of all too many sports-talk shows.

The thinking man's sports yakker, Sandy Clough has such a proclivity for multisyllabic discourse that the weekday morning show he co-hosts with Mike Evans frequently offers "The Sandy Clough Word of the Day" as a way for listeners to pump up their word power. Granted, Clough can be overbearing, but he's also serious and incisive, and provides a welcome contrast to the typical dumb-jock babble of all too many sports-talk shows.

One of the first major buildings to be constructed in the central business district in fifteen years is now rising toward the sky. The federal courthouse annex, at 19th and Champa streets, is meant to relieve crowding at the adjacent federal courthouse -- but it also serves as an impressive contribution to downtown. The new building responds well to the older one: Like the original federal courthouse, the annex has an elegant design -- although this one joins a finely detailed tower to a massive horizontal block. Conceived by resident modernist Ron Mason, a partner in the Denver firm of Anderson Mason Dale (with Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum serving as associate architects), the annex is destined to be among the city's best high-rises.
One of the first major buildings to be constructed in the central business district in fifteen years is now rising toward the sky. The federal courthouse annex, at 19th and Champa streets, is meant to relieve crowding at the adjacent federal courthouse -- but it also serves as an impressive contribution to downtown. The new building responds well to the older one: Like the original federal courthouse, the annex has an elegant design -- although this one joins a finely detailed tower to a massive horizontal block. Conceived by resident modernist Ron Mason, a partner in the Denver firm of Anderson Mason Dale (with Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum serving as associate architects), the annex is destined to be among the city's best high-rises.
Heading down Blake Street, you may do a double take when you spot the brand-new, red-and-blond-brick 16 Market Square, designed by Hartman Cox, along with Quinlivan Pierik & Krause and David Owen Tryba. "Did they move the Sugar Building?" you might ask. Or worse: "Am I heading the wrong way down Wazee Street?" Actually, the new building is only reminiscent of its older neighbor in terms of color, size and corner location: The Sugar Building was modern for its time, but 16 Market Square is traditional for its era. Despite its antique veneer, the building features state-of-the-art, 21st-century amenities. It's also a nice addition to the neighborhood.

Heading down Blake Street, you may do a double take when you spot the brand-new, red-and-blond-brick 16 Market Square, designed by Hartman Cox, along with Quinlivan Pierik & Krause and David Owen Tryba. "Did they move the Sugar Building?" you might ask. Or worse: "Am I heading the wrong way down Wazee Street?" Actually, the new building is only reminiscent of its older neighbor in terms of color, size and corner location: The Sugar Building was modern for its time, but 16 Market Square is traditional for its era. Despite its antique veneer, the building features state-of-the-art, 21st-century amenities. It's also a nice addition to the neighborhood.

The long-suffering voice of the Denver Nuggets manages to remain on an even keel when the team is playing over its collective head, as well as when it's failing to meet expectations (a much more common scenario). Jerry Schemmel's no-muss-no-fuss delivery and the matter-of-fact tone he uses when expressing his opinions may be the main reason fans of the sub-par squad haven't yet leapt off the nearest cliff.

The long-suffering voice of the Denver Nuggets manages to remain on an even keel when the team is playing over its collective head, as well as when it's failing to meet expectations (a much more common scenario). Jerry Schemmel's no-muss-no-fuss delivery and the matter-of-fact tone he uses when expressing his opinions may be the main reason fans of the sub-par squad haven't yet leapt off the nearest cliff.

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