On the second floor of the Denver Club Building, the Eisenhower Chapel is a perfect place for busy business types to escape the noise and motion of downtown: to pray, to meditate, to read or to just eat lunch while sitting on one of the long pews. The non-sectarian refuge, established by the Lions Club in 1955, is open to the public from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; bring your own thoughts.

On the second floor of the Denver Club Building, the Eisenhower Chapel is a perfect place for busy business types to escape the noise and motion of downtown: to pray, to meditate, to read or to just eat lunch while sitting on one of the long pews. The non-sectarian refuge, established by the Lions Club in 1955, is open to the public from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; bring your own thoughts.

Former Bronco and current Denver Post columnist Reggie Rivers recently had his airtime halved; his 3-7 p.m. weekday program on KHOW now ends two hours earlier. And that's a shame, because while his transition to a drive-time host wasn't entirely smooth, he's developed into an interesting and thoughtful presence who's much more willing than the vast majority of his colleagues to hear out callers with opinions that differ from his.
Former Bronco and current Denver Post columnist Reggie Rivers recently had his airtime halved; his 3-7 p.m. weekday program on KHOW now ends two hours earlier. And that's a shame, because while his transition to a drive-time host wasn't entirely smooth, he's developed into an interesting and thoughtful presence who's much more willing than the vast majority of his colleagues to hear out callers with opinions that differ from his.
Joe Williams, who's been around this market since time immemorial, has honed his shtick to perfection on The Fan. The self-proclaimed "Voice of Reason" is a cranky, crotchety, argumentative blast from the past who makes up half of what can be a fine old-style comedy team. (Credit Irv Brown for providing the other half.)
Joe Williams, who's been around this market since time immemorial, has honed his shtick to perfection on The Fan. The self-proclaimed "Voice of Reason" is a cranky, crotchety, argumentative blast from the past who makes up half of what can be a fine old-style comedy team. (Credit Irv Brown for providing the other half.)
The Capitol Heights Apartments, designed by Denver's Studio Completiva and developed by Bruce Heitler, has just risen on what had been one of the bleakest vacant lots in Capitol Hill. The design is sharp, with retro-modern flourishes here and there, such as a striking porte cochere and tutti-frutti-colored walls. Naysayers may point out that the materials aren't as fine as the design -- but that simply proves that just because cheap materials like synthetic stucco are used, it doesn't mean the results have to be ugly.

The Capitol Heights Apartments, designed by Denver's Studio Completiva and developed by Bruce Heitler, has just risen on what had been one of the bleakest vacant lots in Capitol Hill. The design is sharp, with retro-modern flourishes here and there, such as a striking porte cochere and tutti-frutti-colored walls. Naysayers may point out that the materials aren't as fine as the design -- but that simply proves that just because cheap materials like synthetic stucco are used, it doesn't mean the results have to be ugly.

After the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, the U.S. General Services Administration began exploring ways to make its properties more "user-friendly." Denver's Byron G. Rogers Federal Building and Courthouse was one of the first in line, and the GSA's original plans for the facility included demolition of the courtyard and trashing of the Edgar Britton-designed bronze sunscreen. Thankfully, the Colorado Historical Society's Dale Heckendorn reminded the GSA that the 1960s complex, by local luminary James Sudler, had been identified by Historic Denver as one of the city's most significant examples of modern architecture. Oops! To its credit, the GSA has come up with new plans that will enhance, rather than destroy, the elegant original.
After the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, the U.S. General Services Administration began exploring ways to make its properties more "user-friendly." Denver's Byron G. Rogers Federal Building and Courthouse was one of the first in line, and the GSA's original plans for the facility included demolition of the courtyard and trashing of the Edgar Britton-designed bronze sunscreen. Thankfully, the Colorado Historical Society's Dale Heckendorn reminded the GSA that the 1960s complex, by local luminary James Sudler, had been identified by Historic Denver as one of the city's most significant examples of modern architecture. Oops! To its credit, the GSA has come up with new plans that will enhance, rather than destroy, the elegant original.

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