Drew Soicher, the wiseacre brother of Channel 4's Marc Soicher, has a nicely jaded sense of humor, which he exhibits both during newscasts (love his witty "Drew or False" feature) and while reporting. In one memorable package, he tried to patch up the differences between two warring hockey players by telling each that his counterpart wanted to get to know him better. The players involved didn't get the joke, but the audience sure did.
Drew Soicher, the wiseacre brother of Channel 4's Marc Soicher, has a nicely jaded sense of humor, which he exhibits both during newscasts (love his witty "Drew or False" feature) and while reporting. In one memorable package, he tried to patch up the differences between two warring hockey players by telling each that his counterpart wanted to get to know him better. The players involved didn't get the joke, but the audience sure did.
Construction of a wildly fanciful wing for the Denver Art Museum, designed by architectural superstar Daniel Libeskind, is about to get under way just south of the museum. Although its unconventional structure has been likened to a plane crash, this wing will surely be one of the best buildings in town. Almost as remarkable as the Libeskind design is that DAM director Lewis Sharp was savvy enough to have guided the commissioning process, allowing overlapping committees to have their say but also making sure that the existing Gio Ponti museum building was protected.

Construction of a wildly fanciful wing for the Denver Art Museum, designed by architectural superstar Daniel Libeskind, is about to get under way just south of the museum. Although its unconventional structure has been likened to a plane crash, this wing will surely be one of the best buildings in town. Almost as remarkable as the Libeskind design is that DAM director Lewis Sharp was savvy enough to have guided the commissioning process, allowing overlapping committees to have their say but also making sure that the existing Gio Ponti museum building was protected.

Lynn Carey's work ethic, which she displays weekdays on Channel 7 and a slew of radio stations, including the Peak, KDKO, KNUS and Boulder's KWAB, was honed in area restaurants. She spent twenty years working as a waitress at such places as McCormick's Fish House & Bar and Dixons Downtown Grille (she still subs at the Edgewater Inn on occasion), and she brings a waitperson's mentality to the traffic beat. In other words, she does her best to fill every order and gets the information to customers while it's hot.

Lynn Carey's work ethic, which she displays weekdays on Channel 7 and a slew of radio stations, including the Peak, KDKO, KNUS and Boulder's KWAB, was honed in area restaurants. She spent twenty years working as a waitress at such places as McCormick's Fish House & Bar and Dixons Downtown Grille (she still subs at the Edgewater Inn on occasion), and she brings a waitperson's mentality to the traffic beat. In other words, she does her best to fill every order and gets the information to customers while it's hot.

The El Jebel Shrine Temple was designed in 1906 by the Baerresen brothers, Denver's kookiest early architects. The Shrine is a former Masonic temple, but it looks like an Arabian Nights fantasy plopped smack-dab in the middle of Capitol Hill. And like many good things in Denver, it's been in danger of falling into the hands of developers who would just as soon demolish it as cherish it. But now Denver developers Wes Becker and Martin Wohnlich may be coming to the rescue. They recently paid $3.9 million -- a steal considering all the barrel vaults and gold-painted plaster work inside -- to buy the building (the former home of the Eulipions theater group), with plans to preserve the many gorgeous interior spaces. To do so, though, they need the money that would be generated by building a fifty-story tower on what is now a parking lot next door to the temple. And they've taken a sensible, sensitive approach to that, too: They've already hired local architect David Owen Tryba to design the tower and supervise the restoration of the old building.
The El Jebel Shrine Temple was designed in 1906 by the Baerresen brothers, Denver's kookiest early architects. The Shrine is a former Masonic temple, but it looks like an Arabian Nights fantasy plopped smack-dab in the middle of Capitol Hill. And like many good things in Denver, it's been in danger of falling into the hands of developers who would just as soon demolish it as cherish it. But now Denver developers Wes Becker and Martin Wohnlich may be coming to the rescue. They recently paid $3.9 million -- a steal considering all the barrel vaults and gold-painted plaster work inside -- to buy the building (the former home of the Eulipions theater group), with plans to preserve the many gorgeous interior spaces. To do so, though, they need the money that would be generated by building a fifty-story tower on what is now a parking lot next door to the temple. And they've taken a sensible, sensitive approach to that, too: They've already hired local architect David Owen Tryba to design the tower and supervise the restoration of the old building.
The Greg Thunder and Bo Reynolds tandem, formerly heard on Alice during the afternoon shift, is a significant improvement over Jamie White and Danny Bonaduce, who are slated to return to Denver airwaves later this year on KTCL. Thunder and Reynolds offer up jokey, relationship-oriented talk and comedy à la White and Bonaduce, but they do so in a more accessible, less insulting way. A major upgrade, and a boost to a market desperately in need of new radio stars.

The Greg Thunder and Bo Reynolds tandem, formerly heard on Alice during the afternoon shift, is a significant improvement over Jamie White and Danny Bonaduce, who are slated to return to Denver airwaves later this year on KTCL. Thunder and Reynolds offer up jokey, relationship-oriented talk and comedy à la White and Bonaduce, but they do so in a more accessible, less insulting way. A major upgrade, and a boost to a market desperately in need of new radio stars.

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