The North Jeffco Parks and Recreation District opened what it claims is the largest municipal recreation center in the nation this past summer. And we're not about to argue: Apex Center's 168,000 square feet encompass two indoor ice rinks, a therapy pool, an indoor walking and running track, indoor water-play pools, a lap pool, three gyms and a weight room. And don't forget the snack bar and locker rooms and the decor that brings the Colorado outdoors in through window walls, murals and indoor plantings. The whole $28 million facility is designed to accommodate 2,500 people per day.
Safe at home! Bruce Hellerstein calls it "the one and only museum totally dedicated to our national pastime's ballparks," and it's certainly the biggest baseball museum this side of the Mississippi. It's also the only one located in a home, but still open to the public (by appointment only, and just on weekends). Hellerstein's personal collection includes seats from thirty parks, bricks, photographs, postcards, miscellanea and a re-creation of the domed entrance to Ebbets Field. Not life-sized, sadly.

Safe at home! Bruce Hellerstein calls it "the one and only museum totally dedicated to our national pastime's ballparks," and it's certainly the biggest baseball museum this side of the Mississippi. It's also the only one located in a home, but still open to the public (by appointment only, and just on weekends). Hellerstein's personal collection includes seats from thirty parks, bricks, photographs, postcards, miscellanea and a re-creation of the domed entrance to Ebbets Field. Not life-sized, sadly.

Steele Elementary School
Once upon a time, Room 103 of Denver's Steele Elementary School was just another classroom -- then it became a shining example of educational enterprise. First, in 1983, someone hung a dome from the ceiling and added a projector to throw changing images of the night sky across it. Then, in 1989, fifth-grade teacher Ralph Sodano officially became Denver Public Schools' resident astronomy educator. Today he gives two or three shows a day to more than 6,000 children annually. The shows, presented during the school year, and only by appointment, are always free, even to groups from outside DPS. Sodano organizes his displays for the appropriate age and education level; otherwise, the sky's the limit. Steele's a star!
Once upon a time, Room 103 of Denver's Steele Elementary School was just another classroom -- then it became a shining example of educational enterprise. First, in 1983, someone hung a dome from the ceiling and added a projector to throw changing images of the night sky across it. Then, in 1989, fifth-grade teacher Ralph Sodano officially became Denver Public Schools' resident astronomy educator. Today he gives two or three shows a day to more than 6,000 children annually. The shows, presented during the school year, and only by appointment, are always free, even to groups from outside DPS. Sodano organizes his displays for the appropriate age and education level; otherwise, the sky's the limit. Steele's a star!
While the pot o' Super Bowl gold has eluded him recently, Broncos coach Mike Shanahan felt at home as grand marshal of this year's St. Patrick's Day parade in Denver. Although parade organizers make a point about it being the "second largest" such event in the U.S., it's doubtful that Shanahan would stand pat, so to speak, with that. He was probably scanning the waiver wires afterward, scouting out a few first-round bagpipers and some beefy leprechauns to bring this parade to the top.
While the pot o' Super Bowl gold has eluded him recently, Broncos coach Mike Shanahan felt at home as grand marshal of this year's St. Patrick's Day parade in Denver. Although parade organizers make a point about it being the "second largest" such event in the U.S., it's doubtful that Shanahan would stand pat, so to speak, with that. He was probably scanning the waiver wires afterward, scouting out a few first-round bagpipers and some beefy leprechauns to bring this parade to the top.
Even within the circle of Colorado's intensely competitive kids' soccer leagues, the Lakewood-based Rush teams stand out as almost unwholesomely dominant. This past season, boys and girls playing for the club nearly made a clean sweep of the state tournaments, winning fifteen of the eighteen age-group competitions. The Rush rules!
Even within the circle of Colorado's intensely competitive kids' soccer leagues, the Lakewood-based Rush teams stand out as almost unwholesomely dominant. This past season, boys and girls playing for the club nearly made a clean sweep of the state tournaments, winning fifteen of the eighteen age-group competitions. The Rush rules!
By belting out a roar at halftime during the Broncos-Patriots skirmish, the vein-popping fiends, er, fans at Mile High bested the previous Guinness world record for loudest stadium roar. Their combined efforts, which measured 128.7 decibels, drowned out the previous record set in 1998 at an Irish rugby match. The din equaled the rumble of a jumbo jet, according to officials. Perhaps the only way to top it would be to suit up Mr. Elway -- and, of course, try again in a new stadium that's reportedly capable of sounding twice as loud.

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