Twenty miles south of Denver, the jumble of red rocks known as the Fountain Formation includes an outcropping that looks remarkably like George Washington's profile. The resemblance is so startling that the area in which the rock stands was known as Old Washington Park for years, until confusion with Denver's Washington Park inspired a new name: Roxborough Park. The best time to catch a glimpse of George, who stands to the west of Fountain Valley Trail, is during one of Roxborough's moonlight hikes.

Although it's sometimes difficult to tell the difference between the lights on E-470 and the light of the moon, the evening walks at the Plains Conservation Center, a 1,100-acre plot of preserved prairie, can still transport you to another time and place. The center hosts a walk during the full moons of every month except January and February. Each one celebrates a different feature of the natural world, but all delve into history, ecology and cultural stories about the moon. For instance, there's the Hunger Moon in March, when walkers carry warmed baked potatoes, and the Coyote Moon, during which you can call out to the local "moondogs" to see if they'll respond. All walks start at about 7:30 p.m., last a little more than two hours and end with a campfire and marshmallow roast. Everyone is invited, although reservations are required, and the center discourages small children because of the length of the walks.

Although it's sometimes difficult to tell the difference between the lights on E-470 and the light of the moon, the evening walks at the Plains Conservation Center, a 1,100-acre plot of preserved prairie, can still transport you to another time and place. The center hosts a walk during the full moons of every month except January and February. Each one celebrates a different feature of the natural world, but all delve into history, ecology and cultural stories about the moon. For instance, there's the Hunger Moon in March, when walkers carry warmed baked potatoes, and the Coyote Moon, during which you can call out to the local "moondogs" to see if they'll respond. All walks start at about 7:30 p.m., last a little more than two hours and end with a campfire and marshmallow roast. Everyone is invited, although reservations are required, and the center discourages small children because of the length of the walks.

We're not necessarily advocating this, but thanks to D'Lance Golf, there is such a thing as nonstop golfing. A membership to this high-tech practice facility will buy you, among other things, access to the 6,000-square-foot building's practice toys any hour of the day. Thrill to the Dead-Solid Simulators at 3 a.m.! Bombard the chipping, pitching and sand area until dawn! Study the results of the Golf Achiever (measures ball trajectory, spin and speed) during regular business hours (it's too complicated to use without assistance). An annual membership for an insomniac adult is $419.

We're not necessarily advocating this, but thanks to D'Lance Golf, there is such a thing as nonstop golfing. A membership to this high-tech practice facility will buy you, among other things, access to the 6,000-square-foot building's practice toys any hour of the day. Thrill to the Dead-Solid Simulators at 3 a.m.! Bombard the chipping, pitching and sand area until dawn! Study the results of the Golf Achiever (measures ball trajectory, spin and speed) during regular business hours (it's too complicated to use without assistance). An annual membership for an insomniac adult is $419.

If you've ever stumbled out of a LoDo bar on a certain weekend night in August to find yourself surrounded by bicyclists, don't worry -- it wasn't that fourth martini. Every year, thousands of riders gather near downtown at midnight for the Moonlight Classic, a twenty-mile, after-dark ride that wends its way all over the city. With help from the Denver police, event organizers close off some of the busiest streets to give cyclists a new, lunar perspective on the city. In the past, the course route has gone through LoDo, Cherry Creek, Park Hill, Capitol Hill and other neighborhoods. "Last year we had about 4,500 riders," says event director Scot Harris. "This year it may be 5,000. It's growing steadily." The ninth annual Moonlight Classic, which benefits Seniors, Inc!, kicks off at the State Capitol on August 18. This ride's a real howl.

If you've ever stumbled out of a LoDo bar on a certain weekend night in August to find yourself surrounded by bicyclists, don't worry -- it wasn't that fourth martini. Every year, thousands of riders gather near downtown at midnight for the Moonlight Classic, a twenty-mile, after-dark ride that wends its way all over the city. With help from the Denver police, event organizers close off some of the busiest streets to give cyclists a new, lunar perspective on the city. In the past, the course route has gone through LoDo, Cherry Creek, Park Hill, Capitol Hill and other neighborhoods. "Last year we had about 4,500 riders," says event director Scot Harris. "This year it may be 5,000. It's growing steadily." The ninth annual Moonlight Classic, which benefits Seniors, Inc!, kicks off at the State Capitol on August 18. This ride's a real howl.

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