Some argue that college sports have become little more than the minor leagues for the pros, and with the hype surrounding most Division I sports, it's hard to argue. But sometimes the "old college try" still involves more than the bottom line. Such is the case with Sonny Lubick. Many big-name college football programs would love to woo Lubick away from Fort Collins, but CSU football's savior is staying put. When the Butte, Montana, native took over the Rams seven years ago, they had managed just nine winning seasons and one bowl appearance in 34 years. Since 1993, they've won 49 games and three conference titles, played in three Holiday Bowls and been nationally ranked four times. Last season, Lubick's charges went 10-2, beat Louisville in the Liberty Bowl and finished the year ranked number fourteen by Associated Press. Next up for Coach Sonny? Rival CU at the big IF on September 1.
You may have seen some of them at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, or maybe at the Smithsonian, but only in Wray, on the southern edge of the Sand Hills near the Nebraska border, can you see where these 10,000-year-old bison bones came from. They were originally unearthed in 1972 when a local rancher was digging an irrigation ditch; the Smithsonian later excavated the site, which yielded more than 41,000 bones, 248 stone artifacts and thousands of remains of smaller animals. As thanks for the town's contribution to adding to this treasure trove of science, the museum set up a permanent exhibit in Wray, complete with a few precious bison bones.
You may have seen some of them at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, or maybe at the Smithsonian, but only in Wray, on the southern edge of the Sand Hills near the Nebraska border, can you see where these 10,000-year-old bison bones came from. They were originally unearthed in 1972 when a local rancher was digging an irrigation ditch; the Smithsonian later excavated the site, which yielded more than 41,000 bones, 248 stone artifacts and thousands of remains of smaller animals. As thanks for the town's contribution to adding to this treasure trove of science, the museum set up a permanent exhibit in Wray, complete with a few precious bison bones.
When the Metropolitan State Roadrunners won the NCAA Division II basketball title last spring, they were loaded with senior talent. This season, the senior star is power forward Rashawn Fulcher, a 6'2", 220-pound bruiser who looks more like an inside linebacker than a hoopster. Dubbed "Buff" by teammates in awe of his physique, the Oakland, California, native has led the team with fourteen points per game and shot an impressive 51 percent from the field. Throw in 31 steals and 30 assists, and you've got the entire package. Recently named to the Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference all-league team, he led the Roadrunners to post-season play again this year.

When the Metropolitan State Roadrunners won the NCAA Division II basketball title last spring, they were loaded with senior talent. This season, the senior star is power forward Rashawn Fulcher, a 6'2", 220-pound bruiser who looks more like an inside linebacker than a hoopster. Dubbed "Buff" by teammates in awe of his physique, the Oakland, California, native has led the team with fourteen points per game and shot an impressive 51 percent from the field. Throw in 31 steals and 30 assists, and you've got the entire package. Recently named to the Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference all-league team, he led the Roadrunners to post-season play again this year.

Beginning in the early 1920s, Winks Lodge gave African-Americans their very own private retreat in the mountains -- an important resource, since other resorts were often closed to them. Some of the best-known entertainers of the day, including Lena Horne and Duke Ellington, are said to have visited the lodge, located right on South Boulder Creek in Lincoln Hills. The resort also included lots for private cabins and Camp Nezoni, the only YWCA camp for black women between Missouri and the West Coast. Although the lodge ceased operation in the 1960s, through the efforts of Bertha Calloway, who attended Camp Nezoni as a child, it was placed on the National Register of Historic Landmarks in the 1980s.

Beginning in the early 1920s, Winks Lodge gave African-Americans their very own private retreat in the mountains -- an important resource, since other resorts were often closed to them. Some of the best-known entertainers of the day, including Lena Horne and Duke Ellington, are said to have visited the lodge, located right on South Boulder Creek in Lincoln Hills. The resort also included lots for private cabins and Camp Nezoni, the only YWCA camp for black women between Missouri and the West Coast. Although the lodge ceased operation in the 1960s, through the efforts of Bertha Calloway, who attended Camp Nezoni as a child, it was placed on the National Register of Historic Landmarks in the 1980s.

Everybody from former winners Vijay Singh and Phil Mickelson to the craziest heatstroke victims screaming "You da man!" from the gallery on fourteen agree: The creamy, Häagen-Dazs-laced milkshakes for sale at The International golf tournament at Castle Pines Country Club are the best on tour, maybe the best on the planet. Especially when the August sun is blazing and your favorite player has just double-bogeyed that little par three on the backside. Tournament director Jack Vickers is known as one of the best hosts in golf, and the icy confections in the green and white cups have become a personal trademark.
Everybody from former winners Vijay Singh and Phil Mickelson to the craziest heatstroke victims screaming "You da man!" from the gallery on fourteen agree: The creamy, Häagen-Dazs-laced milkshakes for sale at The International golf tournament at Castle Pines Country Club are the best on tour, maybe the best on the planet. Especially when the August sun is blazing and your favorite player has just double-bogeyed that little par three on the backside. Tournament director Jack Vickers is known as one of the best hosts in golf, and the icy confections in the green and white cups have become a personal trademark.
There are plenty of bike clubs, but several factors separate Team Evergreen from other velocipedal gatherings. Start with location: Most of the training rides -- usually every Sunday -- wind through (and up and down and up and down) the foothills west of Denver, some of the most scenic and challenging pavement around. The rides are progressive, too, starting with easier pedals in the spring and becoming increasingly more difficult. This is because the program is largely geared toward preparation for Team Evergreen's big shindig, the Triple Bypass, a one-day, 120-mile, three-mountain-pass, 10,000-foot-of-elevation-gain bit of a hell ride from Evergreen to Avon (this year scheduled for July 14). Organized rides continue into October. While some members are serious bikers (loud, silly-looking shirts, goofy sunglasses, shaved legs), many are just out for a good time. Best of all, the club strives to buff the image of all bikers by putting its money where its wheels are. Last year it donated $20,000 to various causes. Explains TE president David Nelson, "We're trying to reach out to the community to let them know the cyclist they're about to pass is a decent person."

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