Best Thing to Do When You Have Two Extra Hours at DIA

Que Bueno!
Concourse B

It used to be that if you got to the airport early, you'd head up to the official U.S. Post Office in the main terminal to pay your bills (on the theory that the best flight insurance is making sure your survivors won't find any embarrassing past-due notices), then do some banking, enjoy a couple of brews and take a look at the latest exhibit on the walkway heading toward Concourse A. But that was then, this is now. And in the post-9/11 world, no one dawdles on the way to security -- not because getting felt up by DIA's enthusiastic friskers is such a treat, but because you can't risk getting stuck in a slow-moving line. Which means, of course, that when you get through security quickly, your entertainment options are limited to the concourses. That's when it's time to head to Que Bueno! on Concourse B, where the burritos are so tasty, so big and so fat that it might take you a couple of hours to digest one. But fair warning: Que Bueno! is a lot more crowded than it used to be, which means you could waste many, many minutes waiting to order -- and then still more arguing that, yes, you really want that sauce fuego.


You're taking the last plane out of Clarksville, and you forgot your book. And your gum, your bottled water and your earplugs. Not to worry: W. H. Smith keeps one of its six airport shops open all night, and it's conveniently located in the main terminal, right outside the security checkpoint that's the last to shut down for the night. In keeping with its 24/7 status, the shop stocks a wider variety of items than you'll find at its concourse outlets, including reading materials, snacks and travel necessities. Those landing at DIA in the wee hours, after their planes have been socked in by the weather in Omaha, might want to stop by and stock up on aspirin: They'll need some after they realize that the shuttles have quit running.

Best Place to Find Sewer Help on New Year's Eve

Colorado Sewer Service

You're dressed up in your best Soup-and-Fish or evening gown, just about to trip the light fantastic on New Year's Eve, when you detect a murky puddle oozing up from the basement drain. Who ya gonna call? Try Colorado Sewer. While they can't work miracles, they do work that evening. And with a little luck, you can have whatever ails your house snaked out so that you can still sneak out before the stroke of midnight.


The Emily Griffith Opportunity School (EGOS) has been an educational resource for over 85 years, but even Miss Emily herself would be amazed to see its 21st-century outreach. Folks seeking careers in everything from aviation to manicuring can click on the school's site and start flying. Visitors also can see photos of recent grads, hints on finances and other good things. And if you don't like the school's Web site, sign up for EGOS Web design classes -- maybe you can be its next creator.


The DPL's impressive effort to post thousands of images from its photography archives - images of Colorado and the West stretching over a century and a half, with extensive collections dealing with everything from the Ludlow Massacre to the changing face of Denver's downtown--is a cyber surfer's delight. Browse, search or wallow, if you prefer, but click on over and travel back in time.


Admit it: You have plenty of time to read, but not enough time to browse the local library. At the Highlands Ranch Library, adult patrons can have librarians select titles that match their tastes simply by filling out an application including information on favorite authors and books read in the past. They'll call you when your books are ready for pickup; it's that simple. Make that one John Grisham with a side of Stephen King to go.


The Colorado Talking Book Library (CTBL) was created to give disabled book-lovers more options. The government-funded program offers Braille books, taped books and playback machines. You must apply and meet certain requirements to use the facility, but once you do, it's completely free, including usage and shipping of the books and machines. Adding to the convenience, books may be ordered by phone.


Small and unassuming, Hijos de Sol is a good deed in every way, from the stunning Leo Tanguma mural that dresses up the neighborhood and announces the little store's existence around the corner, to its humanitarian intent to ensure that profits from coffees and handcrafts go to the Latin American villagers who package or create them. But as the mural's shimmering presence outside implies, Hijos also supports art, offering striking black-and-white Diego Rivera prints, postcards of works by contemporary Mexican artists and a specialized selection of art books, including particularly beautiful bilingual or Spanish-language children's picture books, such as Matthew Gollub's Oaxacan folk tales with illustrations by painter and muralist Leovigildo Martínez and the autobiographical Family Pictures, by illustrator Carmen Garza. ¡Ándele!


Aficionados maintain that African art tells stories. That's African Experiences owner Miles Forsyth's story, and he's sticking to it. Originally from South Africa, he returns to his home continent every year to visit and to hunt down merchandise, and he's been wildly successful. The walls of his shop are lined with fantastic tribal masks, as well as vibrant patterned rugs and weavings, and the exotic Zulu baskets woven in geometric earth tones are sublime. Tribe it -- you'll like it.
Prince Philip's Pipes and Tobacco treats you like royalty, with a marvelous selection of all-legal imports and an extremely knowledgeable and customer-oriented proprietor, Jon Cacherat, to help guide you in your selections. Celebs and working stiffs fire up stogies and trade tips on pipe tobacco in the shop's thoroughly democratic (and pungent) atmosphere.


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