It's debatable whether the joint operating agreement between the Rocky Mountain News and the Denver Post saved the News from sure death -- but it certainly seems to have lit a fire under the staff. The Post has the edge in terms of resources, but the News is doing more with less. We're glad Denver remains a two-newspaper town, and the Post definitely is capable of making a comeback. But if you only have time to read one daily these days, make it the News.


While it's easy for daily newspaper columnists to take on obvious targets, like scandal-plagued Enron, it's a lot harder to attack the companies in their own back yards. The commentators run the risk of outraging the company's employees and being blamed for the loss of advertising when angry CEOs yank their ads out of the paper. That makes Denver Post business editor Al Lewis all the more remarkable. During the past year, he's taken on the likes of Qwest and Level 3 with gutsy delight, aiming his acerbic wit directly at the CEOs who helped lead both companies into stock-market meltdowns. Here's hoping Lewis keeps his pen sharp and his words aimed directly at the heart of corporate arrogance.
While it's easy for daily newspaper columnists to take on obvious targets, like scandal-plagued Enron, it's a lot harder to attack the companies in their own back yards. The commentators run the risk of outraging the company's employees and being blamed for the loss of advertising when angry CEOs yank their ads out of the paper. That makes Denver Post business editor Al Lewis all the more remarkable. During the past year, he's taken on the likes of Qwest and Level 3 with gutsy delight, aiming his acerbic wit directly at the CEOs who helped lead both companies into stock-market meltdowns. Here's hoping Lewis keeps his pen sharp and his words aimed directly at the heart of corporate arrogance.


Mike Littwin, columnist for the Rocky Mountain News, is the town's finest writer. He tackles more varied subject matter and is capable of being amusing and incisive at the same time. No wonder he wins in a walk.
Mike Littwin, columnist for the Rocky Mountain News, is the town's finest writer. He tackles more varied subject matter and is capable of being amusing and incisive at the same time. No wonder he wins in a walk.


Best Evidence That Having Something to Live For Staves Off Death

Gene Amole
Rocky Mountain News

Since announcing last year that he's dying and that he planned to document the process, media veteran and longtime Rocky Mountain News columnist Gene Amole has become unexpectedly energized, churning out far more copy than he had in ages. These days, he's returned to writing about topics other than himself, like current events, and has even taken a trip to Hawaii. When you've got a purpose again, why die?

Best Evidence That Having Something to Live For Staves Off Death

Gene Amole
Rocky Mountain News

Since announcing last year that he's dying and that he planned to document the process, media veteran and longtime Rocky Mountain News columnist Gene Amole has become unexpectedly energized, churning out far more copy than he had in ages. These days, he's returned to writing about topics other than himself, like current events, and has even taken a trip to Hawaii. When you've got a purpose again, why die?


Located on the only Rocky Mountain News page in the Sunday Denver Post, "Talk Back to the Media" allows disgruntled information consumers and assorted insiders to air their grievances in a public forum -- and members of the journalism community have been responding in kind. For instance, Channel 7 was recently taken to task by four members of the publicity staff at Denver International Airport, prompting reporter John Ferrugia to reply with the sort of venom that's usually reserved for nasty phone calls the public never gets a chance to hear. The results give viewers, listeners and readers a fascinating look at the men and women behind the media curtain.
Located on the only Rocky Mountain News page in the Sunday Denver Post, "Talk Back to the Media" allows disgruntled information consumers and assorted insiders to air their grievances in a public forum -- and members of the journalism community have been responding in kind. For instance, Channel 7 was recently taken to task by four members of the publicity staff at Denver International Airport, prompting reporter John Ferrugia to reply with the sort of venom that's usually reserved for nasty phone calls the public never gets a chance to hear. The results give viewers, listeners and readers a fascinating look at the men and women behind the media curtain.


Lynn Carey and Luan Akin have garnered respect for a few years now for their traffic acumen -- Carey for her radio updates and Akin for her eye-in-the-sky TV work. So, putting them together was the equivalent of creating a traffic all-star squad, which helps explain why Channel 4's traffic coverage has left the competition in the slow lane.

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