Best Evidence That Having Something to Live For Staves Off Death

Gene Amole
Rocky Mountain News

Since announcing last year that he's dying and that he planned to document the process, media veteran and longtime Rocky Mountain News columnist Gene Amole has become unexpectedly energized, churning out far more copy than he had in ages. These days, he's returned to writing about topics other than himself, like current events, and has even taken a trip to Hawaii. When you've got a purpose again, why die?

Best Evidence That Having Something to Live For Staves Off Death

Gene Amole
Rocky Mountain News

Since announcing last year that he's dying and that he planned to document the process, media veteran and longtime Rocky Mountain News columnist Gene Amole has become unexpectedly energized, churning out far more copy than he had in ages. These days, he's returned to writing about topics other than himself, like current events, and has even taken a trip to Hawaii. When you've got a purpose again, why die?


Located on the only Rocky Mountain News page in the Sunday Denver Post, "Talk Back to the Media" allows disgruntled information consumers and assorted insiders to air their grievances in a public forum -- and members of the journalism community have been responding in kind. For instance, Channel 7 was recently taken to task by four members of the publicity staff at Denver International Airport, prompting reporter John Ferrugia to reply with the sort of venom that's usually reserved for nasty phone calls the public never gets a chance to hear. The results give viewers, listeners and readers a fascinating look at the men and women behind the media curtain.
Located on the only Rocky Mountain News page in the Sunday Denver Post, "Talk Back to the Media" allows disgruntled information consumers and assorted insiders to air their grievances in a public forum -- and members of the journalism community have been responding in kind. For instance, Channel 7 was recently taken to task by four members of the publicity staff at Denver International Airport, prompting reporter John Ferrugia to reply with the sort of venom that's usually reserved for nasty phone calls the public never gets a chance to hear. The results give viewers, listeners and readers a fascinating look at the men and women behind the media curtain.


Lynn Carey and Luan Akin have garnered respect for a few years now for their traffic acumen -- Carey for her radio updates and Akin for her eye-in-the-sky TV work. So, putting them together was the equivalent of creating a traffic all-star squad, which helps explain why Channel 4's traffic coverage has left the competition in the slow lane.
Lynn Carey and Luan Akin have garnered respect for a few years now for their traffic acumen -- Carey for her radio updates and Akin for her eye-in-the-sky TV work. So, putting them together was the equivalent of creating a traffic all-star squad, which helps explain why Channel 4's traffic coverage has left the competition in the slow lane.


Keep your eyes on the road! Scott Yates does, and the result is MyTrafficNews, an amusing, informative, highly opinionated Web site. "Our corporate philosophy is that the world could use a little less of the corporate mindset," reads the site's fine print. "Traffic is a drag, and we just want to do what we can to help, starting with trying to treat readers like human beings." A good example of that treatment: Readers can get personalized afternoon e-mails that predict problems on their commute home that day. Sponsored by RTD with an assist from 9News (and its helicopter), MyTrafficNews dispenses current traffic and construction information with a humorous twist: "Unless a volcano erupts underneath the Mousetrap," read one posting on March 11, "we're figuring today will be a better drive home than it was Friday."
Keep your eyes on the road! Scott Yates does, and the result is MyTrafficNews, an amusing, informative, highly opinionated Web site. "Our corporate philosophy is that the world could use a little less of the corporate mindset," reads the site's fine print. "Traffic is a drag, and we just want to do what we can to help, starting with trying to treat readers like human beings." A good example of that treatment: Readers can get personalized afternoon e-mails that predict problems on their commute home that day. Sponsored by RTD with an assist from 9News (and its helicopter), MyTrafficNews dispenses current traffic and construction information with a humorous twist: "Unless a volcano erupts underneath the Mousetrap," read one posting on March 11, "we're figuring today will be a better drive home than it was Friday."


When idling up Floyd Hill at half-speed and with a full load, truckers from Allied Van Lines apparently don't have much else to do than take in the view. That's why, in a recent survey of more than 300 of these professionals -- men and women who prowl the interstates from coast to coast -- they voted Colorado's I-70 the most scenic stretch of asphalt in the nation. Of course, motorists stuck in gridlock -- and between a couple of diesel-puffing big rigs -- near Georgetown on a ski-weekend afternoon probably have another way to describe the scene.
When idling up Floyd Hill at half-speed and with a full load, truckers from Allied Van Lines apparently don't have much else to do than take in the view. That's why, in a recent survey of more than 300 of these professionals -- men and women who prowl the interstates from coast to coast -- they voted Colorado's I-70 the most scenic stretch of asphalt in the nation. Of course, motorists stuck in gridlock -- and between a couple of diesel-puffing big rigs -- near Georgetown on a ski-weekend afternoon probably have another way to describe the scene.


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