This past January, 30,000 people marched from City Park to Civic Center Park in Denver's Martin Luther King Jr. "Marade" (a word that combines the civil-rights leader's name with 'parade') to remember one of the greatest men in American history. The annual event -- one of the biggest MLK celebrations in the country -- is also just plain fun. For one day, differences between people seem to melt away, as black grandfathers march with Hispanic teenagers and white mothers pushing strollers, politicians rub shoulders with labor leaders and teachers march with students. The whole thing makes Colfax Avenue seem like the friendliest place on earth.
This past January, 30,000 people marched from City Park to Civic Center Park in Denver's Martin Luther King Jr. "Marade" (a word that combines the civil-rights leader's name with 'parade') to remember one of the greatest men in American history. The annual event -- one of the biggest MLK celebrations in the country -- is also just plain fun. For one day, differences between people seem to melt away, as black grandfathers march with Hispanic teenagers and white mothers pushing strollers, politicians rub shoulders with labor leaders and teachers march with students. The whole thing makes Colfax Avenue seem like the friendliest place on earth.

Best Way to Avoid Standing in Line at City Hall

www.denvergov.org

The city's official Web address, www.denvergov.org, has been pumped up of late. Real-estate property-tax records have become searchable online, as have contractors' license records -- and businesses can even file their personal-property declarations using the site. That's your government working for you.


Best Way to Avoid Standing in Line at City Hall

www.denvergov.org

The city's official Web address, www.denvergov.org, has been pumped up of late. Real-estate property-tax records have become searchable online, as have contractors' license records -- and businesses can even file their personal-property declarations using the site. That's your government working for you.
In the wake of September 11, security experts decided that the main entrance to the City and County Building should be locked and all traffic funneled through a side door. Besides being a big pain in the neck for workers and visitors alike, it smacked of a siege mentality gone too far. The decision to finally reopen the doors of City Hall on January 28 afforded Mayor Wellington Webb an opportunity to do a bit of grandstanding: "This is the people's building, and we are not going to let the terrorists win," he said. But the plain fact was that taking off the locks and chains provided a minor but significant sign that normalcy was returning.
In the wake of September 11, security experts decided that the main entrance to the City and County Building should be locked and all traffic funneled through a side door. Besides being a big pain in the neck for workers and visitors alike, it smacked of a siege mentality gone too far. The decision to finally reopen the doors of City Hall on January 28 afforded Mayor Wellington Webb an opportunity to do a bit of grandstanding: "This is the people's building, and we are not going to let the terrorists win," he said. But the plain fact was that taking off the locks and chains provided a minor but significant sign that normalcy was returning.


Sports Authority Field at Mile High
One less ugly, crumbling parking lot; one more nice Denver building. For the last several years, the Civic Center Office Building, a gleaming new twelve-story edifice, has been rising at the north end of Civic Center Park. When it opens this summer, the structure, designed by David Owen Tryba with RNL Design, will provide badly needed office space for the City and County of Denver. The building -- especially the main tower, a contemporary neo-modernist confection with dramatically curving walls of aluminum and glass -- will also provide a nice complement to the rigidly rectilinear 1949 city-owned international-style Annex I, which will be connected to it by a large atrium. The new building's height allows a graceful transition between the relatively low profile of the monumental public buildings of the Civic Center and the much taller commercial skyscrapers just behind it in the central business district.
One less ugly, crumbling parking lot; one more nice Denver building. For the last several years, the Civic Center Office Building, a gleaming new twelve-story edifice, has been rising at the north end of Civic Center Park. When it opens this summer, the structure, designed by David Owen Tryba with RNL Design, will provide badly needed office space for the City and County of Denver. The building -- especially the main tower, a contemporary neo-modernist confection with dramatically curving walls of aluminum and glass -- will also provide a nice complement to the rigidly rectilinear 1949 city-owned international-style Annex I, which will be connected to it by a large atrium. The new building's height allows a graceful transition between the relatively low profile of the monumental public buildings of the Civic Center and the much taller commercial skyscrapers just behind it in the central business district.


Annex I was used for decades as offices for the City and County of Denver, but it was originally built in 1949 as part of a never-finished and ultimately abandoned downtown campus for the University of Denver. It was designed by local architects Smith, Hegner and Moore, with G. Meredith Musick. And although Annex I is radically different from the older neo-classical buildings in the Civic Center, it blends in because it's been appropriately clad in a similarly cut gray stone. Despite the many architectural plaudits Annex I has received, however, over the years it became a sport among amateurs to hate it, and the administration of Mayor Wellington Webb threatened to demolish it. So it was a surprise when Webb actually saved Annex I, including it in the city's plans for the new Civic Center Office Building. Government work has become a little easier to look at.
Annex I was used for decades as offices for the City and County of Denver, but it was originally built in 1949 as part of a never-finished and ultimately abandoned downtown campus for the University of Denver. It was designed by local architects Smith, Hegner and Moore, with G. Meredith Musick. And although Annex I is radically different from the older neo-classical buildings in the Civic Center, it blends in because it's been appropriately clad in a similarly cut gray stone. Despite the many architectural plaudits Annex I has received, however, over the years it became a sport among amateurs to hate it, and the administration of Mayor Wellington Webb threatened to demolish it. So it was a surprise when Webb actually saved Annex I, including it in the city's plans for the new Civic Center Office Building. Government work has become a little easier to look at.


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