World-class, our ass: We're just looking for a place to park it. And here at the corner of 14th and Champa streets, like a struggling, spindly daisy peeking out from the surrounding weeds

of greed that charge up to $2 per twenty minutes, we're feelin' Allright, uh-huh. Bordered on one side by a light-rail station and only steps from the performing-arts complex and the convention center, this centrally located oasis of sanity is the cheapest lot within a six-block radius, charging $1 per half-hour, with a $4 maximum on weekdays; on nights and weekends, the rate goes up and down depending on what events are taking place nearby. On theater nights, this best-kept secret means you'll miss the crawl to get out of DCPA's parking garage. And as an added touch, there's a four-story mural of a flower -- courtesy of the Denver Botanic Gardens -- painted on the side of the Davis & Shaw building next door, which gives off a warm, welcoming vibe that says Denver isn't a city that has to steal from its citizens to feel like it's come up in the world. That means a lot.

World-class, our ass: We're just looking for a place to park it. And here at the corner of 14th and Champa streets, like a struggling, spindly daisy peeking out from the surrounding weeds

of greed that charge up to $2 per twenty minutes, we're feelin' Allright, uh-huh. Bordered on one side by a light-rail station and only steps from the performing-arts complex and the convention center, this centrally located oasis of sanity is the cheapest lot within a six-block radius, charging $1 per half-hour, with a $4 maximum on weekdays; on nights and weekends, the rate goes up and down depending on what events are taking place nearby. On theater nights, this best-kept secret means you'll miss the crawl to get out of DCPA's parking garage. And as an added touch, there's a four-story mural of a flower -- courtesy of the Denver Botanic Gardens -- painted on the side of the Davis & Shaw building next door, which gives off a warm, welcoming vibe that says Denver isn't a city that has to steal from its citizens to feel like it's come up in the world. That means a lot.


To raise money for the soon-to-be-renovated Union Station -- the Denver landmark that, with the addition of light rail, has been re-energized as a transportation hub -- the nonprofit Lodo District is selling 8,000 engraved bricks that will form a plaza at the station's entrance. The price of this immortality? A mere $75 -- to a major $1,500. Like the station, the Lodo District is enjoying a surge of energy, too, having just hired hardworking board president and historian Barbara Gibson to serve as director. All aboard!
To raise money for the soon-to-be-renovated Union Station -- the Denver landmark that, with the addition of light rail, has been re-energized as a transportation hub -- the nonprofit Lodo District is selling 8,000 engraved bricks that will form a plaza at the station's entrance. The price of this immortality? A mere $75 -- to a major $1,500. Like the station, the Lodo District is enjoying a surge of energy, too, having just hired hardworking board president and historian Barbara Gibson to serve as director. All aboard!


Residents who've watched their neighborhoods get eaten alive by the T-Rex highway-widening project will soon get a concrete consolation prize: Art on the Highway. Local artists Barb McKee and Carolyn Braaksma, whose experience on massive public-art programs inspired them to form a company called Surface Strategy, convinced T-Rex planners to include images on the giant sound and retaining walls going up alongside I-25 -- and then won the job of creating them. About 675,000 square feet will be textured with the artists' work, stylized designs ranging from native birds and grasses to tepees and modern city maps.
Residents who've watched their neighborhoods get eaten alive by the T-Rex highway-widening project will soon get a concrete consolation prize: Art on the Highway. Local artists Barb McKee and Carolyn Braaksma, whose experience on massive public-art programs inspired them to form a company called Surface Strategy, convinced T-Rex planners to include images on the giant sound and retaining walls going up alongside I-25 -- and then won the job of creating them. About 675,000 square feet will be textured with the artists' work, stylized designs ranging from native birds and grasses to tepees and modern city maps.


Thanks to T-Rex, last year ListenUp was forced to leave one of its longtime homes, a building on South Logan Street, and move its offices to East Evans. To let customers know about the relocation, Walt Stinson, the owner of this venerable home-electronics store, had the rear of the Logan building (the part visible from I-25) covered with a giant mural featuring an especially groovy and nasty-looking dinosaur tearing up the interstate. It was his commentary on T-Rex and on his forced move. And the image rang true for motorists stuck in construction-enhanced traffic jams, too.
Thanks to T-Rex, last year ListenUp was forced to leave one of its longtime homes, a building on South Logan Street, and move its offices to East Evans. To let customers know about the relocation, Walt Stinson, the owner of this venerable home-electronics store, had the rear of the Logan building (the part visible from I-25) covered with a giant mural featuring an especially groovy and nasty-looking dinosaur tearing up the interstate. It was his commentary on T-Rex and on his forced move. And the image rang true for motorists stuck in construction-enhanced traffic jams, too.


Best Place to Watch Drug Deals on Your Lunch Hour

Civic Center Park

No+place+says+Denver+like+Civic+Center+Park.
Anchored at either end by the Denver City and County Building and the Colorado State Capitol, Civic Center Park is home to the People's Fair, the Taste of Colorado and Colorado Avalanche Stanley Cup celebrations. It's also home to scores of drug dealers who ply their wares 24/7 behind the pillars of the Greek Theater. Anyone curious about who's buying weed, opium and crack in Denver these days is advised to pack a picnic lunch, head down to the park on a sunny day and take up an observation post on a concrete bench close to the flower gardens. The action's usually heaviest around lunchtime, when the men in neckties come in search of a midday hit.

Best Place to Watch Drug Deals on Your Lunch Hour

Civic Center Park

Anchored at either end by the Denver City and County Building and the Colorado State Capitol, Civic Center Park is home to the People's Fair, the Taste of Colorado and Colorado Avalanche Stanley Cup celebrations. It's also home to scores of drug dealers who ply their wares 24/7 behind the pillars of the Greek Theater. Anyone curious about who's buying weed, opium and crack in Denver these days is advised to pack a picnic lunch, head down to the park on a sunny day and take up an observation post on a concrete bench close to the flower gardens. The action's usually heaviest around lunchtime, when the men in neckties come in search of a midday hit.


Best Of Denver®

Best Of