Coloradans have become dispirited over the last few years as they've watched wall-to-wall subdivisions creep over the Front Range and pristine mountain valleys turn into gated communities filled with trophy homes. Now the Nature Conservancy is trying to do something about it. The group has launched a $75 million campaign to protect fifteen unique Colorado landscapes, from the dry plains of eastern Colorado's Arickaree River to the sandstone canyons of the Western Slope's Glade Park. The group has made a priority of buying land along rivers, which are often abundant with wildlife but also popular places for vacation homes. In addition, the Nature Conservancy plans to work closely with ranchers and farmers to protect both wildlife and agriculture in rural Colorado. In a state where growth often seems out of control, that's a development we can all cheer.
Coloradans have become dispirited over the last few years as they've watched wall-to-wall subdivisions creep over the Front Range and pristine mountain valleys turn into gated communities filled with trophy homes. Now the Nature Conservancy is trying to do something about it. The group has launched a $75 million campaign to protect fifteen unique Colorado landscapes, from the dry plains of eastern Colorado's Arickaree River to the sandstone canyons of the Western Slope's Glade Park. The group has made a priority of buying land along rivers, which are often abundant with wildlife but also popular places for vacation homes. In addition, the Nature Conservancy plans to work closely with ranchers and farmers to protect both wildlife and agriculture in rural Colorado. In a state where growth often seems out of control, that's a development we can all cheer.
There are plenty of charming mountain towns in the area, but none as close to Denver as Golden. Washington Avenue, the main drag, features a justly famous welcome sign ("Howdy folks!") and numerous noteworthy attractions, including the Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum, the Foothills Art Center and Foss Drug, a sprawling general store stocked with everything from novelty toilet paper to restored gas pumps. As an added bonus, there's also Old Capitol Grill, a watering hole and eatery on the site of what was once Colorado's pre-statehood territorial capitol; it's among the handful of places in the country that serves Barmen Pilsner, an authentic German-style golden pilsner by Coors.
There are plenty of charming mountain towns in the area, but none as close to Denver as Golden. Washington Avenue, the main drag, features a justly famous welcome sign ("Howdy folks!") and numerous noteworthy attractions, including the Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum, the Foothills Art Center and Foss Drug, a sprawling general store stocked with everything from novelty toilet paper to restored gas pumps. As an added bonus, there's also Old Capitol Grill, a watering hole and eatery on the site of what was once Colorado's pre-statehood territorial capitol; it's among the handful of places in the country that serves Barmen Pilsner, an authentic German-style golden pilsner by Coors.


World-class, our ass: We're just looking for a place to park it. And here at the corner of 14th and Champa streets, like a struggling, spindly daisy peeking out from the surrounding weeds

of greed that charge up to $2 per twenty minutes, we're feelin' Allright, uh-huh. Bordered on one side by a light-rail station and only steps from the performing-arts complex and the convention center, this centrally located oasis of sanity is the cheapest lot within a six-block radius, charging $1 per half-hour, with a $4 maximum on weekdays; on nights and weekends, the rate goes up and down depending on what events are taking place nearby. On theater nights, this best-kept secret means you'll miss the crawl to get out of DCPA's parking garage. And as an added touch, there's a four-story mural of a flower -- courtesy of the Denver Botanic Gardens -- painted on the side of the Davis & Shaw building next door, which gives off a warm, welcoming vibe that says Denver isn't a city that has to steal from its citizens to feel like it's come up in the world. That means a lot.

World-class, our ass: We're just looking for a place to park it. And here at the corner of 14th and Champa streets, like a struggling, spindly daisy peeking out from the surrounding weeds

of greed that charge up to $2 per twenty minutes, we're feelin' Allright, uh-huh. Bordered on one side by a light-rail station and only steps from the performing-arts complex and the convention center, this centrally located oasis of sanity is the cheapest lot within a six-block radius, charging $1 per half-hour, with a $4 maximum on weekdays; on nights and weekends, the rate goes up and down depending on what events are taking place nearby. On theater nights, this best-kept secret means you'll miss the crawl to get out of DCPA's parking garage. And as an added touch, there's a four-story mural of a flower -- courtesy of the Denver Botanic Gardens -- painted on the side of the Davis & Shaw building next door, which gives off a warm, welcoming vibe that says Denver isn't a city that has to steal from its citizens to feel like it's come up in the world. That means a lot.


To raise money for the soon-to-be-renovated Union Station -- the Denver landmark that, with the addition of light rail, has been re-energized as a transportation hub -- the nonprofit Lodo District is selling 8,000 engraved bricks that will form a plaza at the station's entrance. The price of this immortality? A mere $75 -- to a major $1,500. Like the station, the Lodo District is enjoying a surge of energy, too, having just hired hardworking board president and historian Barbara Gibson to serve as director. All aboard!
To raise money for the soon-to-be-renovated Union Station -- the Denver landmark that, with the addition of light rail, has been re-energized as a transportation hub -- the nonprofit Lodo District is selling 8,000 engraved bricks that will form a plaza at the station's entrance. The price of this immortality? A mere $75 -- to a major $1,500. Like the station, the Lodo District is enjoying a surge of energy, too, having just hired hardworking board president and historian Barbara Gibson to serve as director. All aboard!


Residents who've watched their neighborhoods get eaten alive by the T-Rex highway-widening project will soon get a concrete consolation prize: Art on the Highway. Local artists Barb McKee and Carolyn Braaksma, whose experience on massive public-art programs inspired them to form a company called Surface Strategy, convinced T-Rex planners to include images on the giant sound and retaining walls going up alongside I-25 -- and then won the job of creating them. About 675,000 square feet will be textured with the artists' work, stylized designs ranging from native birds and grasses to tepees and modern city maps.
Residents who've watched their neighborhoods get eaten alive by the T-Rex highway-widening project will soon get a concrete consolation prize: Art on the Highway. Local artists Barb McKee and Carolyn Braaksma, whose experience on massive public-art programs inspired them to form a company called Surface Strategy, convinced T-Rex planners to include images on the giant sound and retaining walls going up alongside I-25 -- and then won the job of creating them. About 675,000 square feet will be textured with the artists' work, stylized designs ranging from native birds and grasses to tepees and modern city maps.


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