Nature's Own president Roy Young likes digging in the dirt. When he isn't manning one of the store's five Colorado locations or promoting environmental awareness, he travels the world in search of fossils; many of those specimens wind up on Nature's Own's shelves alongside rare minerals, handcrafted onyx, educational materials and lots of fun prehistoric products. The stores are a tree-hugger's dream, helmed by an earthy guy who puts his green behind his green beliefs: In November of last year, Young donated a month's net income from his stores to state environmental groups.


Specializing in custom-made and hand-carved portals, the Grand Entrance turns out some of the grandest slabs of wood -- and even bronze -- to ever sport a knob in these parts. Styles range from rustic to arts-and-crafts, and the workmanship is impeccable, particularly the gorgeous floral reliefs, Speakeasy trap doors, cast-iron appointments and distressed and antiqued surfaces. You'll drop a bundle on one of these beauties, but it will always be a pleasure to walk through.


Open sesame: Buds Warehouse has doors -- hundreds of 'em! Big ones, little ones, cheap ones, fancy ones, screen doors, trap doors, closet doors, garage doors -- even a hangar door -- all at the discounted prices that are the trademark of this poor man's Home Depot. And if you can't find what's in your mind's eye, file a request card online, and Buds'll watch for the door of your dreams.


Owners of the basement behemoths created at the turn of the last century don't have too many choices when it comes to keeping their boilers going strong. Luckily, Denver is home to the best. Doc Ball and his son, Rob, never met a boiler they didn't like, and their affections show. With their help, you'll be in hot water for the foreseeable future.
Underground rivers. Oil reservoirs. Toxic energy fields. Angry ghosts. With little more than a pair of L-rods, a hand-held pendulum and a clear mind, Greg Storozuk has found them all. He's a dowser, a diviner, a doodlebug, one of a growing community of men and women who tap into the universal consciousness to seek answers to the unknown. Initially a skeptic, Storozuk handled his first pair of L-rods on a cousin's field in 1972. After locating a water source, he began a lifelong study of the ancient practice. So if you're trying to divine some water -- or maybe just an angry spirit -- Storozuk is your drought or ghost buster.


There are occasions when a mere twenty-pound bag of ice just won't do. Say you need to build an igloo. Maybe you need to carve a giant pair of ice breasts for your brother's bachelor party. Or perhaps you just need cool shavings for a margarita block party. It doesn't happen every day, but it's nice to know the technology's there. Reddy Ice manufacturers 300-pound blocks of frozen water -- 42 x 21 x 10 inches of solid-state agua. Forty-two bucks for clear style; $60 if you really have to see all the way through the block. A few dollars more for delivery.
With two rooms packed to the gills with new and used power compressors, ladders, safety harnesses, masonry tools, brad nailers, hand tools and dry-wall benches, you're sure to find just what you're looking for at Charlie's Second Hand -- and it'll be at least 50 percent less than retail. The place has been in business for fifty years and is a long-held contractors' secret; they know when they really, really, really need a basin wrench, they can get it there for three bucks instead of $25. Almost makes you want to go install your own sink, doesn't it?


Farewell Williams-Sonoma; hello stainless-steel heaven. There's just something intriguing about a ladle the size of a basketball, a whisk as tall as your oldest child, or a wall of giant frying machines. But there's plenty you can use at home. How about a set of those ketchup and mustard squeeze bottles, or a diner-style napkin holder? And at pro rates, order up!


Everyone knows this person -- the one who covers every square inch of her fridge with cheesy magnets: Disneyland souvenirs, maps of the United States, "I'm not fat, I'm fluffy!" Screw that. True hipsters want magnets that titillate, mock or just make a point. Why not adorn the icebox with beefy, leotard-clad men whose identities are obscured by Mexican wrestling masks, '50s kitsch pastiche and, everyone's favorite, magnets that make fun of Dubya? Anyone can make a statement with cute vintage clothes, but it takes a special talent to let your fridge do the talking. Fortunately, All American Vogue can help on both fronts.


If you've got CPS (china-painting syndrome), you know the quality of your finished product depends entirely on the quality of the materials you use. That's why Kathy Peterson, a recognized china- and glass-painting expert, offers only "the good stuff" -- porcelain blanks from Limoges and Arzberg, natural-hair brushes, paints in every color for any surface, gold paste, banding wheels, books. And you don't have to dig to China to get ideas. Her Web site features an online store, tips from Kathy herself, a list of upcoming seminars and useful links to the wide, wonderful world of this dazzling art form. Break in.


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