Most of us realize that a hefty percentage of the shows on Denver radio stations are repetitive, creativity-free and capable of insulting the intelligence of the average house plant, yet we don't do anything about it but complain. So kudos to Jon-Michael DeShazer, who refuses to take the mediocrity of local radio lying down. DenverRadioSucks.com, the Internet site he oversees, is a forum for all listeners who are mad as hell about what's happening on the airwaves and don't want to take it anymore.


Most of us realize that a hefty percentage of the shows on Denver radio stations are repetitive, creativity-free and capable of insulting the intelligence of the average house plant, yet we don't do anything about it but complain. So kudos to Jon-Michael DeShazer, who refuses to take the mediocrity of local radio lying down. DenverRadioSucks.com, the Internet site he oversees, is a forum for all listeners who are mad as hell about what's happening on the airwaves and don't want to take it anymore.
KNRC, which debuted last summer, hasn't yet challenged the hegemony of the assorted Clear Channel outlets that dominate the local news-talk market. But Greg Dobbs, a former ABC-TV correspondent who manned a talk-show for KOA during the '90s, is certainly doing his part. His morning-drive offerings are consistently intelligent and wide-ranging, providing substantive discussions about topics obvious and obscure. In addition, Dobbs serves as the host of State of Colorado, a Friday morning KNRC discussion show derived from a longtime Channel 6 staple. The program works far better on radio than it ever did on TV -- and Dobbs has made the transition just as well.
KNRC, which debuted last summer, hasn't yet challenged the hegemony of the assorted Clear Channel outlets that dominate the local news-talk market. But Greg Dobbs, a former ABC-TV correspondent who manned a talk-show for KOA during the '90s, is certainly doing his part. His morning-drive offerings are consistently intelligent and wide-ranging, providing substantive discussions about topics obvious and obscure. In addition, Dobbs serves as the host of State of Colorado, a Friday morning KNRC discussion show derived from a longtime Channel 6 staple. The program works far better on radio than it ever did on TV -- and Dobbs has made the transition just as well.
As Joni Mitchell sang, you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone. In recent years, Clough has co-hosted The Fan's morning-drive program, and while he could be cranky and curmudgeonly, he also brought rare perspective and intelligence to a medium that's frequently lacking in both. Clough was replaced on the show by Lou From Littleton, an inveterate homer whose shtick is wearing thinner with each passing day. Fortunately, Clough has been moved to an evening slot that, though a little harder to find, still allows him to present the spicy views and incisive opinions that set him apart from other sports-talk yakkers.


As Joni Mitchell sang, you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone. In recent years, Clough has co-hosted The Fan's morning-drive program, and while he could be cranky and curmudgeonly, he also brought rare perspective and intelligence to a medium that's frequently lacking in both. Clough was replaced on the show by Lou From Littleton, an inveterate homer whose shtick is wearing thinner with each passing day. Fortunately, Clough has been moved to an evening slot that, though a little harder to find, still allows him to present the spicy views and incisive opinions that set him apart from other sports-talk yakkers.
In a radio world marked by conformity, Radio 1190, a signal affiliated with the University of Colorado at Boulder, provides a refreshing blast of individuality. The DJs at the outlet, whether they're working standard shifts or specialized shows, are distinguished from their professional counterparts by a love of fresh, outside-the-mainstream sounds, and their unpolished exuberance is infectious. As a result, Radio 1190 is wonderfully old-fashioned and exceedingly contemporary at exactly the same time.


In a radio world marked by conformity, Radio 1190, a signal affiliated with the University of Colorado at Boulder, provides a refreshing blast of individuality. The DJs at the outlet, whether they're working standard shifts or specialized shows, are distinguished from their professional counterparts by a love of fresh, outside-the-mainstream sounds, and their unpolished exuberance is infectious. As a result, Radio 1190 is wonderfully old-fashioned and exceedingly contemporary at exactly the same time.
When most weather forecasters predict storms or systems that either fail to materialize or blow up to much larger proportions than they anticipated, they seldom acknowledge it. Bob Goosmann, on the other hand, is the rare weatherman who'll admit to screwups and explain where things went wrong. He's not afraid to take chances, as he did when positing that the scope of our March blizzard could be "historic." (Hit that one on the nose, didn't he?) But Goosmann makes it clear -- by, among other things, calculating likely temperature ranges instead of pinpointing exact numbers -- that he's in the business of educated guesses, not telling the future. To put it another way, he's the most honest weatherman in the market, and we're the better for it.


When most weather forecasters predict storms or systems that either fail to materialize or blow up to much larger proportions than they anticipated, they seldom acknowledge it. Bob Goosmann, on the other hand, is the rare weatherman who'll admit to screwups and explain where things went wrong. He's not afraid to take chances, as he did when positing that the scope of our March blizzard could be "historic." (Hit that one on the nose, didn't he?) But Goosmann makes it clear -- by, among other things, calculating likely temperature ranges instead of pinpointing exact numbers -- that he's in the business of educated guesses, not telling the future. To put it another way, he's the most honest weatherman in the market, and we're the better for it.

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