Is it possible? Can nice guys finish first? Week after week, much of America pondered that question as bachelor after bachelor fell by the wayside on ABC's The Bachelorette. Meanwhile, hunky former football player and current Vail firefighter Ryan Sutter kept on keeping on, looking like a lovable lug, talking about how much he loves his dog and occasionally reciting poetry to bachelorette Trista Rehn, runner-up on last season's The Bachelor. When Ryan took Trista on a dream date to his adopted home town, for example, he wooed her with this:

Imagine a place fit for angels

Where laughter fills the air.

The whole place fresh and clean

Smells like it just washed its hair.

Apparently Trista's a Breck girl, because she picked Ryan. They're even talking marriage, and so far, theirs appears to be the only reality-TV romance that has a shot at surviving in the real world.


The sitcom Eight Simple Rules for Dating My Daughter doesn't bear a close resemblance to the book of the same title by W. Bruce Cameron, who honed his humor while raising a family in Evergreen and started his writing career by syndicating a column over the Web that was picked up by the Rocky Mountain News. True, John Ritter plays a writer. And true, he does have a nubile teenage daughter on the show -- two nubile teenage daughters, in fact, as well as the obligatory wisecracking son and a practical wife, played by Katey Segal. But that's where the similarity ends: Cameron's much funnier than the ABC show. Still, Eight Simple Rules is one of the few hits of the TV season and has opened new doors for the writer, who's currently working on a screenplay in Hollywood.
The sitcom Eight Simple Rules for Dating My Daughter doesn't bear a close resemblance to the book of the same title by W. Bruce Cameron, who honed his humor while raising a family in Evergreen and started his writing career by syndicating a column over the Web that was picked up by the Rocky Mountain News. True, John Ritter plays a writer. And true, he does have a nubile teenage daughter on the show -- two nubile teenage daughters, in fact, as well as the obligatory wisecracking son and a practical wife, played by Katey Segal. But that's where the similarity ends: Cameron's much funnier than the ABC show. Still, Eight Simple Rules is one of the few hits of the TV season and has opened new doors for the writer, who's currently working on a screenplay in Hollywood.


Best Appearance by Colorado Newlyweds in a National Magazine

Gary Magness/Sarah Siegel
In Style Weddings

Gary Magness and Sarah Siegel, both children of Colorado celebs (he's the son of late cable magnate Bob Magness; she's the daughter of Celestial Seasonings founder Mo Siegel), are not only jet-setting, they're trend-setting: The pair's nuptials were featured in the spring 2003 edition of In Style Weddings. The casino owner and underwear designer, respectively, got married at the Mexican resort of Costa Careyes, where they flew in fifty guests by chartered jet. Eleven months later, Hollywood stars Freddie Prinze Jr. and Sarah Michelle Gellar wed there. Maybe the Phipps Mansion was booked?

Best Appearance by Colorado Newlyweds in a National Magazine

Gary Magness/Sarah Siegel
In Style Weddings

Gary Magness and Sarah Siegel, both children of Colorado celebs (he's the son of late cable magnate Bob Magness; she's the daughter of Celestial Seasonings founder Mo Siegel), are not only jet-setting, they're trend-setting: The pair's nuptials were featured in the spring 2003 edition of In Style Weddings. The casino owner and underwear designer, respectively, got married at the Mexican resort of Costa Careyes, where they flew in fifty guests by chartered jet. Eleven months later, Hollywood stars Freddie Prinze Jr. and Sarah Michelle Gellar wed there. Maybe the Phipps Mansion was booked?


Winter in Colorado is no time to be sporting a swimsuit, but that didn't stop the intrepid folks at Sports Illustrated from their quest to show almost-naked women in the most exotic spots around the globe -- Vietnam, Barbados, Kenya, Meeker. Meeker? For this year's swimsuit edition, SI headed out to Seven Lakes Lodge, an exclusive (rooms go for $1,230 a night, double occupancy), eleven-room lodge outside the town of Meeker. In a spread titled "Hunting, Fishing and Wishing in Colorado," Old Navy model Molly Sims was shown fly-fishing -- topless, of course -- in hip waders, and also straddling a log fence wearing nothing more than a black bikini and rubber boots. Ah, the great outdoors! She looked silly, but the place looked gorgeous.
Winter in Colorado is no time to be sporting a swimsuit, but that didn't stop the intrepid folks at Sports Illustrated from their quest to show almost-naked women in the most exotic spots around the globe -- Vietnam, Barbados, Kenya, Meeker. Meeker? For this year's swimsuit edition, SI headed out to Seven Lakes Lodge, an exclusive (rooms go for $1,230 a night, double occupancy), eleven-room lodge outside the town of Meeker. In a spread titled "Hunting, Fishing and Wishing in Colorado," Old Navy model Molly Sims was shown fly-fishing -- topless, of course -- in hip waders, and also straddling a log fence wearing nothing more than a black bikini and rubber boots. Ah, the great outdoors! She looked silly, but the place looked gorgeous.
For years, the Aurora Sentinel has published photos of men convicted of soliciting ladies, and gents, of the night. But this past July, Denver and its television station, Channel 8, upped the ante on anti-prostitution efforts with the launch of Johns TV, a televised marathon of mug shots that aired six nights a week; "As Seen on Johns TV," a Web version of the program, could also be accessed at www.denvergov.org/johnstv/. The show quickly became a huge success, talked about nationally and aped by Detroit -- but with its success came the seeds of its own destruction: Johns TV had to go on winter hiatus because it was running out of johns. (Some reports credit the show with a 40 percent decrease in soliciting in Denver.) Whatever its social value, Johns TV has opened up a whole new world of entertainment in local cable access, without the hassle of confusing plot lines, scripted dialogue -- or actors going on a Tony Soprano-like strike for more pay. We got your reality TV right here.
For years, the Aurora Sentinel has published photos of men convicted of soliciting ladies, and gents, of the night. But this past July, Denver and its television station, Channel 8, upped the ante on anti-prostitution efforts with the launch of Johns TV, a televised marathon of mug shots that aired six nights a week; "As Seen on Johns TV," a Web version of the program, could also be accessed at www.denvergov.org/johnstv/. The show quickly became a huge success, talked about nationally and aped by Detroit -- but with its success came the seeds of its own destruction: Johns TV had to go on winter hiatus because it was running out of johns. (Some reports credit the show with a 40 percent decrease in soliciting in Denver.) Whatever its social value, Johns TV has opened up a whole new world of entertainment in local cable access, without the hassle of confusing plot lines, scripted dialogue -- or actors going on a Tony Soprano-like strike for more pay. We got your reality TV right here.
Most television news types would do anything to avoid making spectacles of themselves, including having their eyes lasered so that they don't have to wear glasses. But Stacey Donaldson, a second-string weather forecaster on the local Fox affiliate, rejects this theory, opting to wear a pair of dark-framed, oval-rimmed glasses that make her stand out from local news's look-alike pack. People with impaired vision, unite! You have nothing to lose but your squint.

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