In the middle of the blizzard of the century -- depending on where you start counting -- a savvy reader snapped this natural phenomenon in the 1500 block of Stout Street. Meet Frosty, the Snow Man-o-Man.
With a good measure of artistic skill and an even bigger helping of panache, Steve Chucovich's ArchitectureDenver whipped up a brand-new pedestrian bridge that's already a landmark in every sense of the word. The Millennium Bridge dramatically spans the railroad tracks that separate the Platte Valley from LoDo at Riverfront Park, connecting old Denver with new. Suspended from a soaring diagonal mast, steel cables descend to the deck of the walkway, holding it up with theatrical flourish. Painted a brilliant silvery white, the bridge looks like a ship's mast from certain vantage points -- it's particularly nice when seen from the hills of Highland -- pointing the way for Denver's next voyage of discovery.
With a good measure of artistic skill and an even bigger helping of panache, Steve Chucovich's ArchitectureDenver whipped up a brand-new pedestrian bridge that's already a landmark in every sense of the word. The Millennium Bridge dramatically spans the railroad tracks that separate the Platte Valley from LoDo at Riverfront Park, connecting old Denver with new. Suspended from a soaring diagonal mast, steel cables descend to the deck of the walkway, holding it up with theatrical flourish. Painted a brilliant silvery white, the bridge looks like a ship's mast from certain vantage points -- it's particularly nice when seen from the hills of Highland -- pointing the way for Denver's next voyage of discovery.


Best Addition to the Denver Skyline -- Commercial Division

Twins!
Coors Light Billboards

Some love 'em, some hate 'em, but nobody can miss them -- the ubiquitous Klimaszewski sisters, Diane and Elaine, who watch over the Denver skyline from Coors Light billboards, their mountainous assets a match for the peaks to the West. And the twins have done their bit for more than just the scenery: The advertising campaign in which they play such a prominent role has elevated sales of Coors Light, a brew that red-blooded males were once too embarrassed to order.

Best Addition to the Denver Skyline -- Commercial Division

Twins!
Coors Light Billboards

Some love 'em, some hate 'em, but nobody can miss them -- the ubiquitous Klimaszewski sisters, Diane and Elaine, who watch over the Denver skyline from Coors Light billboards, their mountainous assets a match for the peaks to the West. And the twins have done their bit for more than just the scenery: The advertising campaign in which they play such a prominent role has elevated sales of Coors Light, a brew that red-blooded males were once too embarrassed to order.
The Wellington E. Webb building in the Denver Civic Center complex is so lavish, it's been dubbed the "Webb Mahal" and, in honor of its prow-like shape, the "good ship Welly-pop." But the building has undeniable appeal, a large part of it due to public art -- especially Larry Kirkland's untitled sculpture, which has its own nickname: "Big Giant Head." The marble sculpture in the form of a two-faced Janus has generated national attention, even showing up on CNN -- not because it's good (which it is), but because its two noses created a hazard for the blind. It's not easy for a new sculpture to match the best the Civic Center already has to offer, but Kirkland's stands a head above the rest of the city's new public art.
The Wellington E. Webb building in the Denver Civic Center complex is so lavish, it's been dubbed the "Webb Mahal" and, in honor of its prow-like shape, the "good ship Welly-pop." But the building has undeniable appeal, a large part of it due to public art -- especially Larry Kirkland's untitled sculpture, which has its own nickname: "Big Giant Head." The marble sculpture in the form of a two-faced Janus has generated national attention, even showing up on CNN -- not because it's good (which it is), but because its two noses created a hazard for the blind. It's not easy for a new sculpture to match the best the Civic Center already has to offer, but Kirkland's stands a head above the rest of the city's new public art.
A small redstone-and-granite chessboard now stands as a monument to the peaceful co-existence of the old and the new. Attorney Walter Gerash, whose law firm occupies 1439 Court Place -- known in Denver landmark circles as the Curry/Chucovich House -- persuaded workers constructing his twelve-story neighbor, the Wellington E. Webb Municipal Office Building, to spend their spare time and spare stone building the chessboard that now stands in the front yard of the restored two-story Victorian.
A small redstone-and-granite chessboard now stands as a monument to the peaceful co-existence of the old and the new. Attorney Walter Gerash, whose law firm occupies 1439 Court Place -- known in Denver landmark circles as the Curry/Chucovich House -- persuaded workers constructing his twelve-story neighbor, the Wellington E. Webb Municipal Office Building, to spend their spare time and spare stone building the chessboard that now stands in the front yard of the restored two-story Victorian.


There are a lot of kids on the 16th Street Mall who want your spare change, but few who will hammer 5 1/2-inch nails into their noses to get it. Skip and Amy, two kids from Minneapolis, are the exception. Since they arrived in Denver last July, they've been shocking squeamish yuppies on their lunch breaks with their pointed performance art. Skip learned the trick five years ago from circus performers who'd camped in his back yard. Typically, the nails come out clean -- free of blood, brains and boogers -- but that's not always the case. "I've had more bloody noses than I can count," Skip says. If you catch their act, be sure to leave a buck or two to help pay for the nasal surgery these two may need in the future.

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