Think you've got it bad today? Times were much tougher during the Silver Panic, when families were large and "orphan trains"

brought more than 1,500 abandoned children to Denver from the overcrowded East. Some of the children handed over to the Denver Orphans' Home for safekeeping didn't survive bouts with pneumonia and diphtheria; 22 children who died at the home between 1890 and 1910 were buried in tiny, unmarked graves at Riverside. But those graves are unmarked no longer: Cliff Dougal, Riverside's office sales manager, was inspired by Lola Russell of the Northglenn Senior Center to raise $2,500 to pay for a granite memorial at the cemetery. That memorial, inscribed with the names of the orphans who died in Denver, was dedicated this past October.

Before he died, Bill Daniels, the cable entrepreneur, poured much of his considerable fortune into the Daniels Fund, which subsidizes numerous good works. But perhaps its most impressive accomplishment is the Daniels College Prep Program, which has helped hundreds of students attend college -- despite their "non-traditional" high-school profiles. The intensive pro-

gram includes college-prep workshops, summer seminars on a local campus, and volunteer coaches in the senior year of high school to help students prepare for college -- and, perhaps, apply for a Daniels Scholarship.


Before he died, Bill Daniels, the cable entrepreneur, poured much of his considerable fortune into the Daniels Fund, which subsidizes numerous good works. But perhaps its most impressive accomplishment is the Daniels College Prep Program, which has helped hundreds of students attend college -- despite their "non-traditional" high-school profiles. The intensive pro-

gram includes college-prep workshops, summer seminars on a local campus, and volunteer coaches in the senior year of high school to help students prepare for college -- and, perhaps, apply for a Daniels Scholarship.

Deep thoughts paid off big this year for Holmes Rolston III, a philosophy professor at Colorado State University since 1968, who won the million-dollar Templeton Prize for his research advancing the understanding of spiritual realities.
Deep thoughts paid off big this year for Holmes Rolston III, a philosophy professor at Colorado State University since 1968, who won the million-dollar Templeton Prize for his research advancing the understanding of spiritual realities.

Best Of Denver®

Best Of