In a radio world marked by conformity, Radio 1190, a signal affiliated with the University of Colorado at Boulder, provides a refreshing blast of individuality. The DJs at the outlet, whether they're working standard shifts or specialized shows, are distinguished from their professional counterparts by a love of fresh, outside-the-mainstream sounds, and their unpolished exuberance is infectious. As a result, Radio 1190 is wonderfully old-fashioned and exceedingly contemporary at exactly the same time.


In a radio world marked by conformity, Radio 1190, a signal affiliated with the University of Colorado at Boulder, provides a refreshing blast of individuality. The DJs at the outlet, whether they're working standard shifts or specialized shows, are distinguished from their professional counterparts by a love of fresh, outside-the-mainstream sounds, and their unpolished exuberance is infectious. As a result, Radio 1190 is wonderfully old-fashioned and exceedingly contemporary at exactly the same time.
When most weather forecasters predict storms or systems that either fail to materialize or blow up to much larger proportions than they anticipated, they seldom acknowledge it. Bob Goosmann, on the other hand, is the rare weatherman who'll admit to screwups and explain where things went wrong. He's not afraid to take chances, as he did when positing that the scope of our March blizzard could be "historic." (Hit that one on the nose, didn't he?) But Goosmann makes it clear -- by, among other things, calculating likely temperature ranges instead of pinpointing exact numbers -- that he's in the business of educated guesses, not telling the future. To put it another way, he's the most honest weatherman in the market, and we're the better for it.


When most weather forecasters predict storms or systems that either fail to materialize or blow up to much larger proportions than they anticipated, they seldom acknowledge it. Bob Goosmann, on the other hand, is the rare weatherman who'll admit to screwups and explain where things went wrong. He's not afraid to take chances, as he did when positing that the scope of our March blizzard could be "historic." (Hit that one on the nose, didn't he?) But Goosmann makes it clear -- by, among other things, calculating likely temperature ranges instead of pinpointing exact numbers -- that he's in the business of educated guesses, not telling the future. To put it another way, he's the most honest weatherman in the market, and we're the better for it.
When Jim Benemann recently floated the possibility in the press that he might move from Channel 9 to its closest competitor, Channel 4, many industry observers viewed it as a negotiating strategy. But he was serious: On March 21, Channel 4 announced that Benemann, who'd once been a weekend anchor at that station, would be returning to the fold. This move -- and the pride with which Channel 4 announced it -- testifies to Benemann's growing stature in the market. Over a few short years, he's gone from playing second fiddle alongside Channel 9 co-anchor Adele Arakawa to earning a reputation as one of the area's most solid and reliable personalities. Denver -- and Benemann -- can now bank on those qualities.
When Jim Benemann recently floated the possibility in the press that he might move from Channel 9 to its closest competitor, Channel 4, many industry observers viewed it as a negotiating strategy. But he was serious: On March 21, Channel 4 announced that Benemann, who'd once been a weekend anchor at that station, would be returning to the fold. This move -- and the pride with which Channel 4 announced it -- testifies to Benemann's growing stature in the market. Over a few short years, he's gone from playing second fiddle alongside Channel 9 co-anchor Adele Arakawa to earning a reputation as one of the area's most solid and reliable personalities. Denver -- and Benemann -- can now bank on those qualities.
Mark McIntosh's delivery is fiery and pugnacious; when taking viewers through highlights of a sporting event, he often seems ready, willing and able to jump into the action himself. He's also a good writer and reporter who knows when to shut up and let the pictures do the talking and when to step up and swing for the fences.
Mark McIntosh's delivery is fiery and pugnacious; when taking viewers through highlights of a sporting event, he often seems ready, willing and able to jump into the action himself. He's also a good writer and reporter who knows when to shut up and let the pictures do the talking and when to step up and swing for the fences.
During most sportscasts, the focus is on boys, boys, boys; it's as if Title IX never went into effect. But Colorado Sportswomen, a semi-regular program hosted by Channel 4 longtimer Marcia Neville, puts the focus on the other gender, demonstrating along the way that ath-

letes aren't defined by their jockstraps. The Foundation of American Women in Radio and Television recently named Neville best program host for her Colorado Sportswomen work -- a well-deserved honor for a broadcaster who's toiled for years in dudes' shadows.


During most sportscasts, the focus is on boys, boys, boys; it's as if Title IX never went into effect. But Colorado Sportswomen, a semi-regular program hosted by Channel 4 longtimer Marcia Neville, puts the focus on the other gender, demonstrating along the way that ath-

letes aren't defined by their jockstraps. The Foundation of American Women in Radio and Television recently named Neville best program host for her Colorado Sportswomen work -- a well-deserved honor for a broadcaster who's toiled for years in dudes' shadows.

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