Mark McIntosh's delivery is fiery and pugnacious; when taking viewers through highlights of a sporting event, he often seems ready, willing and able to jump into the action himself. He's also a good writer and reporter who knows when to shut up and let the pictures do the talking and when to step up and swing for the fences.
Mark McIntosh's delivery is fiery and pugnacious; when taking viewers through highlights of a sporting event, he often seems ready, willing and able to jump into the action himself. He's also a good writer and reporter who knows when to shut up and let the pictures do the talking and when to step up and swing for the fences.
During most sportscasts, the focus is on boys, boys, boys; it's as if Title IX never went into effect. But Colorado Sportswomen, a semi-regular program hosted by Channel 4 longtimer Marcia Neville, puts the focus on the other gender, demonstrating along the way that ath-

letes aren't defined by their jockstraps. The Foundation of American Women in Radio and Television recently named Neville best program host for her Colorado Sportswomen work -- a well-deserved honor for a broadcaster who's toiled for years in dudes' shadows.


During most sportscasts, the focus is on boys, boys, boys; it's as if Title IX never went into effect. But Colorado Sportswomen, a semi-regular program hosted by Channel 4 longtimer Marcia Neville, puts the focus on the other gender, demonstrating along the way that ath-

letes aren't defined by their jockstraps. The Foundation of American Women in Radio and Television recently named Neville best program host for her Colorado Sportswomen work -- a well-deserved honor for a broadcaster who's toiled for years in dudes' shadows.

Molly Hughes has proven to be a strong addition to Channel 4's late broadcast, and she'll get strong support when Jim Benemann's non-compete with Channel 9 expires and he's able to join her at the anchor desk sometime this fall. The real key to the ten o'clock newcast's success, though, isn't its on-air personnel or flashy graphics, but its newsiness. The station's investigative unit, spearheaded by Brian Maass (who's more adept at pissing off the authorities than any of his peers), is consistently strong -- and not just during sweeps season, either. This dedication to substance gives Channel 4's late-night entry a vitality and heft sadly lacking in its competition.
Molly Hughes has proven to be a strong addition to Channel 4's late broadcast, and she'll get strong support when Jim Benemann's non-compete with Channel 9 expires and he's able to join her at the anchor desk sometime this fall. The real key to the ten o'clock newcast's success, though, isn't its on-air personnel or flashy graphics, but its newsiness. The station's investigative unit, spearheaded by Brian Maass (who's more adept at pissing off the authorities than any of his peers), is consistently strong -- and not just during sweeps season, either. This dedication to substance gives Channel 4's late-night entry a vitality and heft sadly lacking in its competition.
Chemistry is hard to define but easy to recognize -- and Channel 9's Gary Shapiro, Kyle Dyer, Kathy Sabine, Gregg Moss and Drew Soicher have it. They take the prize again this year for their ability to balance news updates of actual significance with lighthearted shenanigans that should be irritating during the a.m. hours, but aren't. For the most part.


Chemistry is hard to define but easy to recognize -- and Channel 9's Gary Shapiro, Kyle Dyer, Kathy Sabine, Gregg Moss and Drew Soicher have it. They take the prize again this year for their ability to balance news updates of actual significance with lighthearted shenanigans that should be irritating during the a.m. hours, but aren't. For the most part.
Greg Moore, a former managing editor with the Boston Globe who was cherry-picked by owner Dean Singleton for the position of Denver Post editor, has been on the job for less than a year, but he's already done what many observers thought would be impossible: He's got people talking about a paper previously regarded as stodgy and deadly dull. The Post isn't yet the great American newspaper that Moore and Singleton envision; there's still a long way to go. But Moore's energy and drive have helped make this goal seem like an actual possibility rather than the haziest of pipe dreams. The rest is up to him.


Best Addition to the Rocky Mountain News

The Stump

We'll admit it: At first the Rocky Mountain News's new design hurt our eyes, and we couldn't imagine how the paper would continue to fill its "channels" -- those left-hand columns earmarked for chatty tidbits, quotes and "by the numbers" trivia. But the News adjusted some type, we adjusted our expectations -- and the channels just kept getting better and better. The most successful of all: The Stump, with notes, odd news and observations from the campaign trail.


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