For those Denverites who don't want to wait through news and wade through weather to get to sports, Rocky Mountain Sports Report, on Fox Sports Rocky Mountain, provides immediate gratification, not to mention a much more in-depth presentation than is available on any of the other local newscasts. Anchor Tim Ring is a fine host with a welcome, low-key approach, and Marc Soicher (Drew's brother) blends in much more smoothly here than he did at his previous station, Channel 4. There's no telling how the show will hold up when Fox Sports loses the rights to Denver Nuggets and Colorado Avalanche broadcasts, as it will in the next year because the teams' owner, Stan Kroenke, is starting his own network. But for now, this Report provides the best sports in town.


Many Denver television personalities are severely lacking in the "personality" part of the equation. Not so Vic Lombardi, who makes every sporting event he covers seem more interesting because he infuses his descriptions with energy and enthusiasm. Steve Atkinson, a competent but fairly bland fellow, gets top billing on Channel 4's highest-profile programming, but Lombardi's likability and high-voltage delivery make him the station's real standout.
Many Denver television personalities are severely lacking in the "personality" part of the equation. Not so Vic Lombardi, who makes every sporting event he covers seem more interesting because he infuses his descriptions with energy and enthusiasm. Steve Atkinson, a competent but fairly bland fellow, gets top billing on Channel 4's highest-profile programming, but Lombardi's likability and high-voltage delivery make him the station's real standout.
Bertha Lynn has been on Denver television long enough to have made a cameo in both the 1980 version of Stephen King's The Shining -- the one starring Jack Nicholson -- and a 1997 TV remake headlined by Steven Weber (apparently the poor man's Jack Nicholson). Still, longevity and experience are only a couple of her noteworthy attributes. She's also got a warm and compassionate on-air approach that's appropriate when talking about subjects both heavy and light. Lynn's an underappreciated Denver original who's definitely ready for her close-up.
Bertha Lynn has been on Denver television long enough to have made a cameo in both the 1980 version of Stephen King's The Shining -- the one starring Jack Nicholson -- and a 1997 TV remake headlined by Steven Weber (apparently the poor man's Jack Nicholson). Still, longevity and experience are only a couple of her noteworthy attributes. She's also got a warm and compassionate on-air approach that's appropriate when talking about subjects both heavy and light. Lynn's an underappreciated Denver original who's definitely ready for her close-up.


At most local stations, elaborate climate-reading gizmos get in the way of the simple, straightforward dissemination of information; watching such weather updates is like trying to figure out if it's going to rain tomorrow by buying a ticket to Laserium. Dave Fraser, on the other hand, is Denver's most direct prognosticator, concentrating on the key aspect of his job -- predicting the freakin' weather -- instead of allowing himself to be overly distracted by fancy screens and flashing colors. If you prefer forecasters who cut to the storm, Fraser's your guy.
At most local stations, elaborate climate-reading gizmos get in the way of the simple, straightforward dissemination of information; watching such weather updates is like trying to figure out if it's going to rain tomorrow by buying a ticket to Laserium. Dave Fraser, on the other hand, is Denver's most direct prognosticator, concentrating on the key aspect of his job -- predicting the freakin' weather -- instead of allowing himself to be overly distracted by fancy screens and flashing colors. If you prefer forecasters who cut to the storm, Fraser's your guy.
Talk is a rare commodity on talk radio these days; it's usually overshadowed by yelling, screaming, one-upmanship and random examples of verbal abuse. But talk still rules on Colorado Matters, which is heard twice daily on KCFR and other stations on the news-talk half of Colorado Public Radio's two-channel network. Dan Drayer, the program's overseer, lets newsmakers, legislators, entertainers and just plain folks speak their piece at a leisurely pace. The show can get a bit sleepy at times, but its drawbacks are balanced by intelligence and a disdain for sound and fury that signify nothing.
Talk is a rare commodity on talk radio these days; it's usually overshadowed by yelling, screaming, one-upmanship and random examples of verbal abuse. But talk still rules on Colorado Matters, which is heard twice daily on KCFR and other stations on the news-talk half of Colorado Public Radio's two-channel network. Dan Drayer, the program's overseer, lets newsmakers, legislators, entertainers and just plain folks speak their piece at a leisurely pace. The show can get a bit sleepy at times, but its drawbacks are balanced by intelligence and a disdain for sound and fury that signify nothing.


A veteran sports columnist at the Denver Post, Jim Armstrong alternates with fellow Post-er Mark Kiszla on The Press Box, a morning-drive show helmed by recent import Tim Neverett. Armstrong doesn't have a typical radio voice, but he's turned out to be an excellent communicator, presenting thoughtful, well-reasoned arguments with a minimum of pomposity or ego and a maximum of humor. A year ago, Armstrong briefly considered ditching sports for news, then reconsidered. His work on 560's morning shift demonstrates that he made the right choice.

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